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Found 73 result(s)
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The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR) contains one of the world’s most unique and important collection of scientific samples from the deep sea. Sediment cores from every major ocean and sea are archived at the Core Repository. The collection contains approximately 72,000 meters of core composed of 9,700 piston cores; 7,000 trigger weight cores; and 2,000 other cores such as box, kasten, and large diameter gravity cores. We also hold 4,000 dredge and grab samples, including a large collection of manganese nodules, many of which were recovered by submersibles. Over 100,000 residues are stored and are available for sampling where core material is expended. In addition to physical samples, a database of the Lamont core collection has been maintained for nearly 50 years and contains information on the geographic location of each collection site, core length, mineralogy and paleontology, lithology, and structure, and more recently, the full text of megascopic descriptions.
Welcome to the home page of the Rutgers/New Jersey Geological and Water Survey Core Repository. We are an official repository of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), hosting Legs 150X and 174AX onshore cores drilled as part of the NJ/Mid-Atlantic Transect, and the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS). Cores from other ODP/IODP repositories are available through ODP. In addition to ODP/IODP cores, we are the repository for: - 1.) 6668 m of Newark Basin Drilling Project Triassic cores (e.g., Olsen, Kent, et al. 1996) - 2.) 5182 m of the Army Corps of Engineers Passaic Tunnel Project Jurassic cores - 3.) 457 m of post-impact cores from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Hole - 4.) Cores obtained from the Northern North Atlantic as part of the IODP Expedition 303/306 - 5.) Cores from various rift and drift basins on the eastern and Gulf Coasts of the U.S. - 6.) Geological samples from the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) including 304 m of continuous NJGWS/USGS NJ coastal plain cores.
The DASH Repository provides persistent data archiving and distribution for small-scale data collections from UCAR/NCAR researchers and projects. This data repository specifically focuses on providing long-term preservation and stewardship of NCAR's small-scale data collections. Complementing other NCAR-managed data repositories, the DASH Repository helps NCAR researchers to enable long term access, interoperability, and reuse of NCAR datasets.
The Woods Hole Open Access Server, WHOAS, is an institutional repository that captures, stores, preserves, and redistributes the intellectual output of the Woods Hole scientific community in digital form. WHOAS is managed by the MBLWHOI Library as a service to the Woods Hole scientific community
The International Ocean Discovery Program’s (IODP) Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) is located in the Research Park on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. This repository stores DSDP, ODP, and IODP cores from the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, and the Southern Ocean. A satellite repository at Rutgers University houses New Jersey/Delaware land cores 150X and 174AX.
The R2R Portal is a central shore-side gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions will be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
Additionally to the institutional repository, current St. Edward's faculty have the option of uploading their work directly to their own SEU accounts on stedwards.figshare.com. Projects created on Figshare will automatically be published on this website as well. For more information, please see documentation
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The Geoscience Data Repository (GDR) is a collection of Earth Sciences Sector geoscience databases that is managed and accessed by a series of Information Services (GDRIS). This site allows you to discover, view and download information using these services. About 27 data resources are listed and many are also listed in the GeoConnections Discovery Portal.
The MGDS MediaBank contains high quality images, illustrations, animations and video clips that are organized into galleries. Media can be sorted by category, and keyword and map-based search options are provided. Each item in the MediaBank is accompanied by metadata that provides access into our cruise catalog and data repository.
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Earth-Prints is an open archive created and maintained by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. This digital collection allows users to browse, search and access manuscripts, journal articles, theses, conference materials, books, book-chapters, web products. The goal of our repository is to collect, capture, disseminate and preserve the results of research in the fields of Atmosphere, Cryosphere, Hydrosphere and Solid Earth. Earth-prints is young and growing rapidly.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
DARECLIMED data repository consists of three kind of data: (a) climate, (b) water resources, and (c) energy related data. The first part, climate datasets, will include atmospheric and indirect atmospheric data, proxies and reconstructions, terrestrial and oceanic data. Land use, population, economy and development data will be added as well. Datasets can be handled and analyzed by connecting to the Live Access Server (LAS), which enables to visualize data with on-the-fly graphics, request custom subsets of variables in a choice of file formats, access background reference material about the data (metadata), and compare (difference) variables from distributed locations. Access to server is granted upon request by emailing the data repository manager.
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
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Global Change Research Data Publishing and Repository (GCdataPR) is an open data infrastructure on earth science, particular on the global environmental changes. The GCdataPR’ management policies following the international common understanding to the data sharing principles and guidelines is the key to make the qualified data publishing and sharing smoothly and successfully. The data management policies including dataset submission for publishing policy, peer review policy data quality control policy data long-term preservation policy, data sharing policy, 10% rule for identify original dataset policy, claim discovery with both data and paper policy, and data service statistics policy.
>>>>!!!<<<<As of March 28, 2016, the 'NSF Arctic Data Center' will serve as the current repository for NSF-funded Arctic data. The ACADIS Gateway http://www.aoncadis.org is no longer accepting data submissions. All data and metadata in the ACADIS system have been transferred to the NSF Arctic Data Center system. There is no need for you to resubmit existing data. >>>>!!!<<<< ACADIS is a repository for Arctic research data to provide data archival, preservation and access for all projects funded by NSF's Arctic Science Program (ARC). Data include long-term observational timeseries, local, regional, and system-scale research from many diverse domains. The Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) program includes data management services.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) provides and collects multi-year continuous data on atmospheric conditions in the Arctic. International Polar Year (IPY) maintains partnerships with Arctic observatories from Sweden, Canada, United States, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. Each IASOA observatory features extensive suites of co-located, research grade active, passive and in-situ observing systems. Atmospheric characteristics of interest are standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances. IASOA operates within boundaries defined by (1) the Arctic (2) the atmosphere (3) the ground-based vantage point (4) data generated by instrument systems and (5) multi-year continuous records to support climate studies.
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This data repository provides access to gravity wave observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. Information on stratospheric gravity wave activity is derived from radiance measurements in the 4.3 and 15 micron CO2 fundamental bands. The repository provides browse images and netCDF data files for the years 2002 to 2017 and is frequently updated.
This website is a portal that enables access to multi-Terabyte turbulence databases. The data reside on several nodes and disks on our database cluster computer and are stored in small 3D subcubes. Positions are indexed using a Z-curve for efficient access.
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
The Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) database of global surface observations is the world's most extensive collection of surface ozone measurements and includes also data on other air pollutants and on weather for some regions. Measurements from 1970 to present have been collected in a relational database, and are made available via a graphical web interface, a REST service (https://join.fz-juelich.de/services/rest/surfacedata/) and as aggregated products on PANGAEA (https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.876108).