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Found 21 result(s)
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.
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BExIS is the online data repository and information system of the Biodiversity Exploratories Project (BE). The BE is a German network of biodiversity related working groups from areas such as vegetation and soil science, zoology and forestry. Up to three years after data acquisition, the data use is restricted to members of the BE. Thereafter, the data is usually public available (https://www.bexis.uni-jena.de/PublicData/PublicDataDefault.aspx).
NatureServe and its network of member programs are a leading source for reliable scientific information about species and ecosystems of the Western Hemisphere. This site serves as a portal for accessing several types of publicly available biodiversity data. The Explorer lists 70,000 plants, animals, and ecological communities of the United States and Canada
AmphibiaWeb is an online system enabling any user to search and retrieve information relating to amphibian biology and conservation. This site was motivated by the global declines of amphibians, the study of which has been hindered by the lack of multidisplinary studies and a lack of coordination in monitoring, in field studies, and in lab studies. We hope AmphibiaWeb will encourage a shared vision to collaboratively face the challenge of global amphibian declines and the conservation of remaining amphibians and their habitats.
The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution data on plants and animals that are critically endangered, endangered and vulnerable. Data are available in Esri File Geodatabase format, Esri Shapefile format, and Excel format.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
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The Norwegian Marine Data Centre (NMD) at the Institute of Marine Research was established as a national data centre dedicated to the professional processing and long-term storage of marine environmental and fisheries data and production of data products. The Institute of Marine Research continuously collects large amounts of data from all Norwegian seas. Data are collected using vessels, observation buoys, manual measurements, gliders – amongst others. NMD maintains the largest collection of marine environmental and fisheries data in Norway.
A real-time, online checklist program, eBird has revolutionized the way that the birding community reports and accesses information about birds. Launched in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, eBird provides rich data sources for basic information on bird abundance and distribution at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. eBird collects observations from birders through portals managed and maintained by local partner conservation organizations. In this way eBird targets specific audiences with the highest level of local expertise, promotion, and project ownership.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
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This portal applicaton brings together the data collected and published via OGC Web-services from the individual observatories and provides access of the data to the public. Therefore, it serves as a database node to provide scientists and decision makers with reliable and well accessible data and data products.
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The Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC) compiles, maintains and provides information on rare, threatened and endangered species and spaces in Ontario. This information is stored in a central repository composed of computerized databases, map files and an information library, which are accessible for conservation applications, land use development planning, park management, etc. Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario.
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Open Research Data provides quality assessed data and their metadata such as context information on measurement objectives, equipment, methods, testing and investigation areas. The purpose of the repository is to secure quality, integrity and long-term availability of landscape and ecosystem research data as well as to enhance accessibility of free data from ZALF long-term monitoring campaigns, landscape laboratories (Agro-ScapeLabs), field trials and experiments. The Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) explores ecosystems in agricultural landscapes and the development of ecologically and economically viable land use systems. ZALF combines scientific expertise from agricultural science, geosciences, biosciences and socio-economics.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
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The project brings together national key players providing environmentally related biological data and services to develop the ‘German Federation for Biological Data' (GFBio). The overall goal is to provide a sustainable, service oriented, national data infrastructure facilitating data sharing and stimulating data intensive science in the fields of biological and environmental research.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
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EMS is the BC Ministry of Environment's primary monitoring data repository. The system was designed to capture data covering physical/chemical and biological analyses performed on water, air, solid waste discharges and ambient monitoring sites throughout the province. It also contains related quality assurance data. Samples are collected by either ministry staff or permittees under the Environmental Management Act and then analyzed in public or private sector laboratories. The majority of such monitoring data is entered into EMS electronically via Electronic Data Transfer (EDT). EMS data is typically available in formatted hard copy reports or electronically in comma delimited (e.g., .csv) files as: Monitoring location-related data, Sample and results-related data. Direct access to EMS is restricted to ministry staff, however public access is available upon request through EMS Web Reporting (http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/emswr/).
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TERN's AEKOS data portal is the original gateway to Australian ecology data. It is a ‘data and research methods’ data portal for Australia’s land-dwelling plants, animals and their environments. The primary focus of data content is raw co-located ‘species and environment’ ecological survey data that has been collected at the ‘plot’ level to describe biodiversity, its patterns and ecological processes. It is openly accessible with standard discovery metadata and user-oriented, contextual metadata critical for data reuse. Our services support the ecosystem science community, land managers and governments seeking to publish under COPE publishing ethics and the FAIR data publishing principles. AEKOS is registered with Thomson & Reuters Data Citation Index and is a recommended repository of Nature Publishing’s Scientific Data. There are currently 97,037 sites covering mostly plant biodiversity and co-located environmental data of Australia. The AEKOS initiative is supported by TERN (tern.org.au), hosted by The University of Adelaide and funded by the Australian Government’s National Research Infrastructure for Australia.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.