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Found 21 result(s)
The Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) is Stanford Libraries' digital preservation system. The core repository provides “back-office” preservation services – data replication, auditing, media migration, and retrieval -- in a secure, sustainable, scalable stewardship environment. Scholars and researchers across disciplines at Stanford use SDR repository services to provide ongoing, persistent, reliable access to their research outputs.
The NCEAS Data Repository contains information about the research data sets collected and collated as part of NCEAS' funded activities. Information in the NCEAS Data Repository is concurrently available through the Knowledge Network for Biocomplexity (KNB), an international data repository. A number of the data sets were synthesized from multiple data sources that originated from the efforts of many contributors, while others originated from a single. Datasets can be found at KNB repository https://knb.ecoinformatics.org/data , creator=NCEAS
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science.
MetPetDB is a database for metamorphic petrology that is being designed and built by a global community of metamorphic petrologists in collaboration with computer scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as part of the National Cyberinfrastructure Initiative and supported by the National Science Foundation.
>>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub mission is now completed. The Cancer Genomics Hub was established in August 2011 to provide a repository to The Cancer Genome Atlas, the childhood cancer initiative Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments and the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative. CGHub rapidly grew to be the largest database of cancer genomes in the world, storing more than 2.5 petabytes of data and serving downloads of nearly 3 petabytes per month. As the central repository for the foundational genome files, CGHub streamlined team science efforts as data became as easy to obtain as downloading from a hard drive. The convenient access to Big Data, and the collaborations that CGHub made possible, are now essential to cancer research. That work continues at the NCI's Genomic Data Commons. All files previously stored at CGHub can be found there. The Website for the Genomic Data Commons is here: https://gdc.nci.nih.gov/ >>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is an NIH-funded research data repository that aims to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. NDAR also serves as a scientific community platform and portal to multiple other research repositories, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data. NDAR combines the function of a data repository, which holds genetic, phenotypic, clinical, and medical imaging data, and the function of a scientific community platform, which defines the standard tools and policies to integrate the computational resources developed by scientific research institutions, private foundations, and other federal and state agencies supporting ASD research. Furthermore, NDAR is working to develop the means to connect relevant repositories together through data federation.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.
VAMDC aims to be an interoperable e-infrastructure that provides the international research community with access to a broad range of atomic and molecular (A&M) data compiled within a set of A&M databases accessible through the provision of this portal and of user software. Furthermore VAMDC aims to provide A&M data providers and compilers with a large dissemination platform for their work. VAMDC infrastructure was established to provide a service to a wide international research community and has been developed in conjunction with consultations and advice from the A&M user community.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
The CCHDO's primary mission is to deliver the highest possible quality global CTD and hydrographic data to users. These data are a product of decades of observations related to the physical characteristics of ocean waters carried out during GO-SHIP, WOCE, CLIVAR and numerous other oceanographic research programs. Whenever possible we provide these data in three easy-to-use formats: WHP-Exchange (which we recommend for data submissions to the CCHDO), WOCE, and netCDF. The CCHDO also manages public and non-public CTD data to be used for the global Argo and OceanSITES programs.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
dbSTS is an NCBI resource that contains sequence data for short genomic landmark sequences or Sequence Tagged Sites. STS sequences are incorporated into the STS Division of GenBank.
Ag Data Commons provides access to a wide variety of open data relevant to agricultural research. We are a centralized repository for data already on the web, as well as for new data being published for the first time. While compliance with the U.S. Federal public access and open data directives is important, we aim to surpass them. Our goal is to foster innovative data re-use, integration, and visualization to support bigger, better science and policy.
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Publication of scans of photographic plates from the so-called "Potsdam zone" of the Carte du Ciel project (32 deg to 39 deg). A total of 977 plates of 2 square degree sky regions was observed and recorded between 1913 to 1924. Since Potsdam Observatory ended participation in the Carte du Ciel project, these observations were so far not analysed or published. Plates were scanned in by a flat bed scanner in 2007-2008. Limitations in astrometric precision as well are to be expected, and specific observational restrains apply, such as multiple exposures on certain plates (see literature)
ForestPlots.net is a web-accessible secure repository for forest plot inventories in South America, Africa and Asia. The database includes plot geographical information; location, taxonomic information and diameter measurements of trees inside each plot; and participants in plot establishment and re-measurement, including principal investigators, field assistants, students.
The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.