Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 50 result(s)
The domain of the IDS repository is the German language, mainly in its current form (contemporary New High German). Its designated community are national and international researchers in German and general linguistics. As an institutional repository, the repository provides long term archival of two important IDS projects: the Deutsches Referenzkorpus (‘German Reference Corpus’, DeReKo), which curates a large corpus of written German language, and the Archiv für Gesprochenes Deutsch (‘Archive of Spoken German’, AGD), which curates several corpora of spoken German. In addition, the repository enables germanistic researchers from IDS and from other research facilities and universities to deposit their research data for long term archival of data and metadata arising from research projects.
The Deep Blue Data repository is a means for University of Michigan researchers to make their research data openly accessible to anyone in the world, provided they meet collections criteria. Submitted data sets undergo a curation review by librarians to support discovery, understanding, and reuse of the data.
Country
The Khazar University Institutional Repository (KUIR), a suite of services offered by the Library Information Center, is an institutional repository maintained to support the university's researchers, collaborators, and students. Repository content consists of collections of research materials in digital format produced and selected by Khazar University faculty and their collaborators.
The Duke Research Data Repository is a service of the Duke University Libraries that provides curation, access, and preservation of research data produced by the Duke community. Duke's RDR is a discipline agnostic institutional data repository that is intended to preserve and make public data related to the teaching and research mission of Duke University including data linked to a publication, research project, and/or class, as well as supplementary software code and documentation used to provide context for the data.
Country
The Tropical Data Hub (TDH) Research Data repository makes data collections and datasets generated by James Cook University researchers searchable and accessible. This increases their visibility and facilitates sharing and collaboration both within JCU and externally. Services provided include archival storage, access controls (open access preferred), metadata review and DOI minting.
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science.
The Spiral Digital Repository is the Imperial College London institutional open access repository. This system allows you, as an author, to make your research documents open access without incurring additional publication costs. When you self-archive a research document in Spiral it becomes free for anyone to read. You can upload copies of your publications to Spiral using Symplectic Elements. All deposited content becomes searchable online.
The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data.
Country
jPOSTrepo (Japan ProteOme STandard Repository) is a repository of sharing MS raw/processed data. It consists of a high-speed file upload process, flexible file management system and easy-to-use interfaces. Users can release their "raw/processed" data via this site with a unique identifier number for the paper publication. Users also can suspend (or "embargo") their data until their paper is published. The file transfer from users’ computer to our repository server is very fast (roughly ten times faster than usual file transfer) and uses only web browsers – it does not require installing any additional software.
ORA-Data is the University of Oxford's digital catalogue and repository for research data, managed by the Bodleian Libraries. It offers a service to archive, preserve and enable the discovery and sharing of data produced by Oxford researchers. Any type of digital research data – from across all academic disciplines – may be deposited in ORA-Data. We accept any file format. ORA-Data is aimed at researchers who: wish to include an entry for their dataset in the University's catalogue of research data, irrespective of where the data is archived need a repository to deposit research data – especially data that underpins publications, and data where the funding body requires archiving and preservation. ORA-Data sits within the original Oxford Research Archive (ORA) for publications, so that data can be linked easily to – and browsed alongside – related publications.
The repository of the Hamburg Centre for Speech Corpora is used for archiving, maintenance, distribution and development of spoken language corpora. These usually consist of audio and / or video recordings, transcriptions and other data and structured metadata. The corpora treat the focus on multilingualism and are generally freely available for research and teaching. Most of the measures maintained by the HZSK corpora were created in the years 2000-2011 in the framework of the SFB 538 "Multilingualism" at the University of Hamburg. The HZSK however also strives to take linguistic data from other projects or contexts, and to provide also the scientific community for research and teaching are available, provided that they are compatible with the current focus of HZSK, ie especially spoken language and multilingualism.
The ADS is an accredited digital repository for heritage data that supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources by preserving and disseminating digital data in the long term. The ADS also promotes good practice in the use of digital data, provides technical advice to the heritage community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
XNAT CENTRAL is a publicly accessible datasharing portal at Washinton University Medical School using XNAT software. XNAT provides neuroimaging data through a web interface and a customizable open source platform. XNAT facilitates data uploads and downloads for data sharing, processing and organization.
Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of 'small molecular entities'. The term 'molecular entity' encompasses any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities in question are either products of nature or synthetic products used to intervene in the processes of living organisms (either deliberately, as for drugs, or unintentionally', as for chemicals in the environment). The qualifier 'small' implies the exclusion of entities directly encoded by the genome, and thus as a rule nucleic acids, proteins and peptides derived from proteins by cleavage are not included.
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
Country
Research Data Australia is the data discovery service of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS). We do not store the data itself here but provide descriptions of, and links to, the data from our data publishing partners. ANDS is funded by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS).
Country
The edoc-Server, start 1998, is the Institutional Repository of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and offers the posibility of text- and data-publications. Every item is published for Open-Access with an optional embargo period of up to five years. Data publications since 01.01.2018.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
IEDB offers easy searching of experimental data characterizing antibody and T cell epitopes studied in humans, non-human primates, and other animal species. Epitopes involved in infectious disease, allergy, autoimmunity, and transplant are included. The IEDB also hosts tools to assist in the prediction and analysis of B cell and T cell epitopes.
Stats NZ (Statistics New Zealand) collects data about New Zealand’s environment, economy and society. The information helps government, local councils, Māori, businesses, communities, researchers and the public to measure, and make decisions about such things as: where we need roads, schools and hospitals, environmental progress, our quality of life, how families are doing, where to locate a business, and what products to sell. The Statistics New Zealand Data Archive is a central repository for all the important statistical datasets and associated documentation, metadata and publications that Statistics New Zealand produces. It also acts as a safe repository for datasets produced by other government agencies and government funded statistical studies. The key difference between the Statistics New Zealand Data Archive and other digital archives is that it contains primarily statistical data at unit record level. The unit record data is archived when it is no longer in regular use by its producer.
Neotoma is a multiproxy paleoecological database that covers the Pliocene-Quaternary, including modern microfossil samples. The database is an international collaborative effort among individuals from 19 institutions, representing multiple constituent databases. There are over 20 data-types within the Neotoma Paleoecological Database, including pollen microfossils, plant macrofossils, vertebrate fauna, diatoms, charcoal, biomarkers, ostracodes, physical sedimentology and water chemistry. Neotoma provides an underlying cyberinfrastructure that enables the development of common software tools for data ingest, discovery, display, analysis, and distribution, while giving domain scientists control over critical taxonomic and other data quality issues.