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Found 8 result(s)
The changing demographic composition has expanded the scope of the U.S. racial and ethnic mosaic. As a result, interest and research on race and ethnicity has become more complex and expansive. RCMD seeks to assist in the public dissemination and preservation of quality data to generate more "good science" for years to come. Finally, RCMD wants to be part of an interactive community of persons interested and be involved in minority related issues/investigations in order to make possible the broadest scope of research endeavors and examinations.
Scholars' Bank is the open access repository for the intellectual work of faculty, students and staff at the University of Oregon and partner institution collections.
The Common Cold Project began in 2011 with the aim of creating, documenting, and archiving a database that combines final research data from 5 prospective viral-challenge studies that were conducted over the preceding 25 years: the British Cold Study (BCS); the three Pittsburgh Cold Studies (PCS1, PCS2, and PCS3); and the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center Cold Study (PMBC). These unique studies assessed predictor (and hypothesized mediating) variables in healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, experimentally exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold, and then monitored them for development of infection and signs and symptoms of illness.
As part of the Open Data Pilot that the COEMS EU H2020 project (https://www.coems.eu/) is participating in, COEMS Open Data Portal devotes to collect software and hardware trace data from both academy and industry partners. Our focus lies on the detection and identification of non-deterministic software failures caused by race conditions and access to inconsistent data. Therefore we will provide an efficient real-time access and analysis for operating safe software systems.
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Xanthobase provides information on Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo), the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogenic bacterium in which genome sequencing has revealed very extensive race differentiation. The whole genome sequence of its native host has also been completed, and analysis of the host parasite interaction on the basis of the two genomes can be expected to be useful.
The Henry A. Murray Research Archive is Harvard's endowed, permanent repository for quantitative and qualitative research data at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, and provides physical storage for the entire IQSS Dataverse Network. Our collection comprises over 100 terabytes of data, audio, and video. We preserve in perpetuity all types of data of interest to the research community, including numerical, video, audio, interview notes, and other data. We accept data deposits through this web site, which is powered by our Dataverse Network software
The Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) is a project of the Population Studies aiming in view to produce a harmonized dataset of U.S. family and fertility surveys spanning five decades (1955-2002). IFSS integrates data from ten underlying component studies of family and fertility encompassing the Growth of American Families (GAF) in 1955 and 1960; National Fertility Surveys (NFS) in 1965 and 1970; as well as National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG) in 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002. The first release contains harmonized sociodemographic variables for all respondents from all ten component studies, including those related to marital status, race and ethnicity, etc. Thus it provides access to researchers, educators, students, policy makers, and others with a data resource to examine issues related to families and fertility in the United States. Potential users can download original/ harmonized datasets (along with documentation) and numerous analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.