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Found 31 result(s)
The Conserved Domain Database is a resource for the annotation of functional units in proteins. Its collection of domain models includes a set curated by NCBI, which utilizes 3D structure to provide insights into sequence/structure/function relationships
The Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB) provides and accepts a circular dichroism spectra data. The PCDDB and it's parent organization, the Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (ISMB), investigate molecular structure using techniques such as biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and computational structure prediction, as methods for protein production and biological characterization.
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The RESID Database of Protein Modifications is a comprehensive collection of annotations and structures for protein modifications including amino-terminal, carboxyl-terminal and peptide chain cross-link post-translational modifications.
The Protein database is a collection of sequences from several sources, including translations from annotated coding regions in GenBank, RefSeq and TPA, as well as records from SwissProt, PIR, PRF, and PDB. Protein sequences are the fundamental determinants of biological structure and function.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
The CATH database is a hierarchical domain classification of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. Protein structures are classified using a combination of automated and manual procedures. There are four major levels in the CATH hierarchy; Class, Architecture, Topology and Homologous superfamily.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.
The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt) is a curated database that provides information about proteins that lack fixed 3D structure in their putatively native states, either in their entirety or in part. DisProt is a community resource annotating protein sequences for intrinsically disorder regions from the literature. It classifies intrinsic disorder based on experimental methods and three ontologies for molecular function, transition and binding partner.
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The Swedish Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues and cells assembled in tissue microarrays. Confocal microscopy analysis using human cell lines is performed for more detailed protein localization. The program hosts the Human Protein Atlas portal with expression profiles of human proteins in tissues and cells. The main objective of the resource centre is to produce specific antibodies to human target proteins using a high-throughput production method involving the cloning and protein expression of Protein Epitope Signature Tags (PrESTs). After purification, the antibodies are used to study expression profiles in cells and tissues and for functional analysis of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms.
The Database explores the interactions of chemicals and proteins. It integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug-target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins.
OrthoMCL is a genome-scale algorithm for grouping orthologous protein sequences. It provides not only groups shared by two or more species/genomes, but also groups representing species-specific gene expansion families. So it serves as an important utility for automated eukaryotic genome annotation. OrthoMCL starts with reciprocal best hits within each genome as potential in-paralog/recent paralog pairs and reciprocal best hits across any two genomes as potential ortholog pairs. Related proteins are interlinked in a similarity graph. Then MCL (Markov Clustering algorithm,Van Dongen 2000; www.micans.org/mcl) is invoked to split mega-clusters. This process is analogous to the manual review in COG construction. MCL clustering is based on weights between each pair of proteins, so to correct for differences in evolutionary distance the weights are normalized before running MCL.
The Yeast Resource Center provides access to data about mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid arrays, deconvolution florescence microscopy, protein structure prediction and computational biology. These services are provided to further the goal of a complete understanding of the chemical interactions required for the maintenance and faithful reproduction of a living cell. The observation that the fundamental biological processes of yeast are conserved among all eukaryotes ensures that this knowledge will shape and advance our understanding of living systems.
The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography includes a repository system and website designed to make the raw data of protein crystallography more widely available. Our focus is on identifying, cataloging and providing the metadata related to datasets, which could be used to reprocess the original diffraction data. The intent behind this project is to make the resulting three dimensional structures more reproducible and easier to modify and improve as processing methods advance.
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
DNASU is a central repository for plasmid clones and collections. Currently we store and distribute over 200,000 plasmids including 75,000 human and mouse plasmids, full genome collections, the protein expression plasmids from the Protein Structure Initiative as the PSI: Biology Material Repository (PSI : Biology-MR), and both small and large collections from individual researchers. We are also a founding member and distributor of the ORFeome Collaboration plasmid collection.
The Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site disseminates information about RNA structure and evolution that has been determined using comparative sequence analysis. We present both raw (sequences, structure models, metadata) and processed (analyses, evolution, accuracy) data, organized into four main sections.
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The DrugBank database is a unique bioinformatics and cheminformatics resource that combines detailed drug (i.e. chemical, pharmacological and pharmaceutical) data with comprehensive drug target (i.e. sequence, structure, and pathway) information. The latest release of DrugBank (version 5.1.1, released 2018-07-03) contains 11,881 drug entries including 2,526 approved small molecule drugs, 1,184 approved biotech (protein/peptide) drugs, 129 nutraceuticals and over 5,751 experimental drugs. Additionally, 5,132 non-redundant protein (i.e. drug target/enzyme/transporter/carrier) sequences are linked to these drug entries. Each DrugCard entry contains more than 200 data fields with half of the information being devoted to drug/chemical data and the other half devoted to drug target or protein data.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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The CyberCell database (CCDB) is a comprehensive collection of detailed enzymatic, biological, chemical, genetic, and molecular biological data about E. coli (strain K12, MG1655). It is intended to provide sufficient information and querying capacity for biologists and computer scientists to use computers or detailed mathematical models to simulate all or part of a bacterial cell at a nanoscopic (10-9 m), mesoscopic (10-8 m).The CyberCell database CCDB actually consists of 4 browsable databases: 1) the main CyberCell database (CCDB - containing gene and protein information), 2) the 3D structure database (CC3D – containing information for structural proteomics), 3) the RNA database (CCRD – containing tRNA and rRNA information), and 4) the metabolite database (CCMD – containing metabolite information). Each of these databases is accessible through hyperlinked buttons located at the top of the CCDB homepage. All CCDB sub-databases are fully web enabled, permitting a wide variety of interactive browsing, search and display operations. and microscopic (10-6 m) level.
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The goal of the Autophagy Database is to provide up-to-date relevant information including protein structure data to researchers of autophagy, and to disseminate important findings to a wider audience so that their ramifications can be appreciated. For this purpose, we strive to make the database to contain as much pertinent information as possible and to make the contents freely available in a user-friendly format.
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ArachnoServer is a manually curated database containing information on the sequence, three-dimensional structure, and biological activity of protein toxins derived from spider venom. Spiders are the largest group of venomous animals and they are predicted to contain by far the largest number of pharmacologically active peptide toxins (Escoubas et al., 2006). ArachnoServer has been custom-built so that a wide range of biological scientists, including neuroscientists, pharmacologists, and toxinologists, can readily access key data relevant to their discipline without being overwhelmed by extraneous information.