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The GTN-P database is an object-related database open for a diverse range of data. Because of the complexity of the PAGE21 project, data provided in the GTN-P management system are extremely diverse, ranging from active-layer thickness measurements once per year to flux measurement every second and everthing else in between. The data can be assigned to two broad categories: Quantitative data which is all data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative data comprise all in situ measurements, i.e. permafrost temperatures and active layer thickness (mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, soil temperature profiles). Qualitative data (knowledge products) are observations not based on measurements, such as observations on soils, vegetation, relief, etc.
The Arctic Permafrost Geospatial Centre (APGC) is an Open Access Circum-Arctic Geospatial Data Portal that promotes, describes and visualizes geospatial permafrost data. A data catalogue and a WebGIS application allow to easily discover and view data and metadata. Data can be downloaded directly via link to the publishing data repository.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
>>>>!!!<<<<As of March 28, 2016, the 'NSF Arctic Data Center' will serve as the current repository for NSF-funded Arctic data. The ACADIS Gateway http://www.aoncadis.org is no longer accepting data submissions. All data and metadata in the ACADIS system have been transferred to the NSF Arctic Data Center system. There is no need for you to resubmit existing data. >>>>!!!<<<< ACADIS is a repository for Arctic research data to provide data archival, preservation and access for all projects funded by NSF's Arctic Science Program (ARC). Data include long-term observational timeseries, local, regional, and system-scale research from many diverse domains. The Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) program includes data management services.
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The MOSES Data Discovery Portal is the central component of the MOSES data management infrastructure. It holds the metadata of MOSES campaigns, sensors and data and enables high-performance data searches. In addition, it provides access to the decentral data repositories and infrastructures of the participating Helmholtz centers where MOSES data is stored.
With the Program EnviDat we develop a unified and managed access portal for WSL's rich reservoir of environmental monitoring and research data. EnviDat is designed as a portal to publish, connect and search across existing data but is not intended to become a large data centre hosting original data. While sharing of data is centrally facilitated, data management remains decentralised and the know-how and responsibility to curate research data remains with the original data providers.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
The goal of NGEE–Arctic is to reduce uncertainty in projections of future climate by developing and validating a model representation of permafrost ecosystems and incorporating that representation into Earth system models. The new modeling capabilities will improve our confidence in model projections and will enable scientist to better respond to questions about processes and interactions now and in the future. It also will allow them to better communicate important results concerning climate change to decision makers and the general public. And let's not forget about summer in the Antarctic, which happens during our winter months.