Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 36 result(s)
The Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) is a repository for biomedical ontologies that aims to provide a single point of access to the latest ontology versions. The user can browse the ontologies through the website as well as programmatically via the OLS API. The OLS provides a web service interface to query multiple ontologies from a single location with a unified output format.The OLS can integrate any ontology available in the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format. The OLS is an open source project hosted on Google Code.
BioPortal is an open repository of biomedical ontologies, a service that provides access to those ontologies, and a set of tools for working with them. BioPortal provides a wide range of such tools, either directly via the BioPortal web site, or using the BioPortal web service REST API. BioPortal also includes community features for adding notes, reviews, and even mappings to specific ontologies. BioPortal has four major product components: the web application; the API services; widgets, or applets, that can be installed on your own site; and a Virtual Appliance version that is available for download or through Amazon Web Services machine instance (AMI). There is also a beta release SPARQL endpoint.
Country
Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
Country
Species included in PlantTFDB 4.0 covers the main lineages of green plants. Therefore, PlantTFDB provides genomic TF repertoires across Viridiplantae. To provide comprehensive information for the TF family, a brief introduction and key references are presented for each family. Comprehensive annotations are made for each identified TF, including functional domains, 3D structures, gene ontology (GO), plant ontology (PO), expression information, expert-curated functional description, regulation information, interaction, conserved elements, references, and annotations in various databases such as UniProt, RefSeq, TransFac, STRING, and VISTA. By inferring orthologous groups and constructing phylogenetic trees, evolutionary relationships among identified TFs were inferred. In addition, PlantTFDB has a simple and user-friendly interface to allow users to query based on combined conditions or make sequence similarity search using BLAST.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
NetSlim is a resource of high-confidence signaling pathway maps derived from NetPath pathway reactions. 40-60% of the molecules and their reactions in NetPath pathways are available in NetSlim.
The goal of the NeuroElectro Project is to extract information about the electrophysiological properties (e.g. resting membrane potentials and membrane time constants) of diverse neuron types from the existing literature and place it into a centralized database.
The repository facilitates computation of a wide range of biosystem data. It also connects biosystem data with associated literature throughout the Entrez system.
The BioCyc database collection of Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) provides a reference on the genomes and metabolic pathways of thousands of sequenced organisms. BioCyc PGDBs are generated by software that predict the metabolic pathways of completely sequenced organisms, predict which genes code for missing enzymes in metabolic pathways, and predict operons. BioCyc also integrates information from other bioinformatics databases, such as protein feature and Gene Ontology information from UniProt. The BioCyc website provides a suite of software tools for database searching and visualization, for omics data analysis, and for comparative genomics and comparative pathway questions. From 2016 on, access to the EcoCyc and MetaCyc databases will remain free. Subscriptions to the other 7,600 BioCyc databases will be available to institutions (e.g., libraries), and to individuals. Access to licensed databases via: http://www.phoenixbioinformatics.org/biocyc .
The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.
FAIRsharing is a web-based, searchable portal of three interlinked registries, containing both in-house and crowdsourced manually curated descriptions of standards, databases and data policies, combined with an integrated view across all three types of resource. By registering your resource on FAIRsharing, you not only gain credit for your work, but you increase its visibility outside of your direct domain, so reducing the potential for unnecessary reinvention and proliferation of standards and databases.
Content type(s)
Datanator is an integrated database of genomic and biochemical data designed to help investigators find data about specific molecules and reactions in specific organisms and specific environments for meta-analyses and mechanistic models. Datanator currently includes metabolite concentrations, RNA modifications and half-lives, protein abundances and modifications, and reaction kinetics integrated from several databases and numerous publications. The Datanator website and REST API provide tools for extracting clouds of data about specific molecules and reactions in specific organisms and specific environments, as well as data about similar molecules and reactions in taxonomically similar organisms.
The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins. This initial release of the UniPROBE database provides a centralized resource for accessing comprehensive data on the preferences of proteins for all possible sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In total, the database currently hosts DNA binding data for 406 nonredundant proteins from a diverse collection of organisms, including the prokaryote Vibrio harveyi, the eukaryotic malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. The database's web tools (on the right) include a text-based search, a function for assessing motif similarity between user-entered data and database PWMs, and a function for locating putative binding sites along user-entered nucleotide sequences
The GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) is a consortium of laboratories working to provide the scientific and medical community with tools to facilitate research. The key components are: (1) a molecular atlas of gene expression for the developing organs of the GenitoUrinary (GU) tract; (2) a high resolution molecular anatomy that highlights development of the GU system; (3) mouse strains to facilitate developmental and functional studies within the GU system; (4) tutorials describing GU organogenesis; and (5) rapid access to primary data via the GUDMAP database.
CryptoDB is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the parasite Cryptosporidium and other related genera. CryptoDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation along with experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers. The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is omim.org.
----<<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out dated >>>>>----- The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.
The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) maintains a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Data available from TAIR includes the complete genome sequence along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene expression, DNA and seed stocks, genome maps, genetic and physical markers, publications, and information about the Arabidopsis research community. Gene product function data is updated every two weeks from the latest published research literature and community data submissions. Gene structures are updated 1-2 times per year using computational and manual methods as well as community submissions of new and updated genes. TAIR also provides extensive linkouts from our data pages to other Arabidopsis resources.
>>>>!!!!<<<< AspGD data are being integrated into FungiDB. Please click here for additional details http://fungidb.org/ . Discussion of how to maximize the value of FungiDB for the Aspergillus research community will be a major topic at the upcoming AsperFest12 meeting at Asilomar (March 16-17, 2015). >>>>!!!!<<<< AspGD is an organized collection of genetic and molecular biological information about the filamentous fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Among its many species, the genus contains an excellent model organism (A. nidulans, or its teleomorph Emericella nidulans), an important pathogen of the immunocompromised (A. fumigatus), an agriculturally important toxin producer (A. flavus), and two species used in industrial processes (A. niger and A. oryzae). AspGD contains information about genes and proteins of multiple Aspergillus species; descriptions and classifications of their biological roles, molecular functions, and subcellular localizations; gene, protein, and chromosome sequence information; tools for analysis and comparison of sequences; and links to literature information; as well as a multispecies comparative genomics browser tool (Sybil) for exploration of orthology and synteny across multiple sequenced Aspergillus species.
The Pseudomonas Genome Database collaborates with an international panel of expert Pseudomonas researchers to provide high quality updates to the PAO1 genome annotation and make cutting edge genome analysis data available.
The sequencing of several bird genomes and the anticipated sequencing of many more provided the impetus to develop a model organism database devoted to the taxonomic class: Aves. Birds provide model organisms important to the study of neurobiology, immunology, genetics, development, oncology, virology, cardiovascular biology, evolution and a variety of other life sciences. Many bird species are also important to agriculture, providing an enormous worldwide food source worldwide. Genomic approaches are proving invaluable to studying traits that affect meat yield, disease resistance, behavior, and bone development along with many other factors affecting productivity. In this context, BirdBase will serve both biomedical and agricultural researchers.