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Found 146 result(s)
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
Welcome to the home page of the Rutgers/New Jersey Geological and Water Survey Core Repository. We are an official repository of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), hosting Legs 150X and 174AX onshore cores drilled as part of the NJ/Mid-Atlantic Transect, and the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS). Cores from other ODP/IODP repositories are available through ODP. In addition to ODP/IODP cores, we are the repository for: - 1.) 6668 m of Newark Basin Drilling Project Triassic cores (e.g., Olsen, Kent, et al. 1996) - 2.) 5182 m of the Army Corps of Engineers Passaic Tunnel Project Jurassic cores - 3.) 457 m of post-impact cores from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Hole - 4.) Cores obtained from the Northern North Atlantic as part of the IODP Expedition 303/306 - 5.) Cores from various rift and drift basins on the eastern and Gulf Coasts of the U.S. - 6.) Geological samples from the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey (NJGWS) and United States Geological Survey (USGS) including 304 m of continuous NJGWS/USGS NJ coastal plain cores.
WHOI is the world's leading non-profit oceanographic research organization. WHOI maintains unparalleled depth and breadth of expertise across a range of oceanographic research areas. Institution scientists and engineers work collaboratively within and across six research departments to advance knowledge of the global ocean and its fundamental importance to other planetary systems. At the same time, they also train future generations of ocean scientists and address problems that have a direct impact in efforts to understand and manage critical marine resources.
Seafloor data at these locations include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution scanning altimetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar, seafloor digital photographs, sample locations, deep-towed magnetic data, and more. Each dataset is geospatially registered and incorporates metadata (e.g., sample geochemistry and time and depth of collection) that can be interactively accessed by the user. The user can control which datasets are shown on a map view of the area and the scale at which the map is viewed. Datasets with resolutions inappropriate for the scale at which they are being viewed are automatically removed from the map.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
World Data Center for Oceanography serves to store and provide to users data on physical, chemical and dynamical parameters of the global ocean as well as oceanography-related papers and publications, which are either came from other countries through the international exchange or provided to the international exchange by organizations of the Russian Federation
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
The goal of this web site is to enable users to easily access ocean science data, run data assimilation models, and visualize both data and models. The concept of OurOcean is to allow users with minimal resource requirements to access data and interact with models.
State of the Salmon provides data on abundance, diversity, and ecosystem health of wild salmon populations specific to the Pacific Ocean, North Western North America, and Asia. Data downloads are available using two geographic frameworks: Salmon Ecoregions or Hydro 1K.
The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) site offers operational data in near-real time and historic contexts. Focus is on tides and currents but also includes information on harmful algal blooms and weather, etc. Data access is made possible through geopspatial web interfaces as well as OPeNDAP services, etc.
Open Core Data is a data infrastructure focused on making data from scientific continental and ocean drilling projects semantically discoverable, persistent, citable, and approachable to maximize their utility to present and future geoscience researchers.
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The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR) contains one of the world’s most unique and important collection of scientific samples from the deep sea. Sediment cores from every major ocean and sea are archived at the Core Repository. The collection contains approximately 72,000 meters of core composed of 9,700 piston cores; 7,000 trigger weight cores; and 2,000 other cores such as box, kasten, and large diameter gravity cores. We also hold 4,000 dredge and grab samples, including a large collection of manganese nodules, many of which were recovered by submersibles. Over 100,000 residues are stored and are available for sampling where core material is expended. In addition to physical samples, a database of the Lamont core collection has been maintained for nearly 50 years and contains information on the geographic location of each collection site, core length, mineralogy and paleontology, lithology, and structure, and more recently, the full text of megascopic descriptions.
The programme "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products.
SeaBASS, the publicly shared archive of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data maintained by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG). High quality in situ measurements are prerequisite for satellite data product validation, algorithm development, and many climate-related inquiries. As such, the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) maintains a local repository of in situ oceanographic and atmospheric data to support their regular scientific analyses. The SeaWiFS Project originally developed this system, SeaBASS, to catalog radiometric and phytoplankton pigment data used their calibration and validation activities. To facilitate the assembly of a global data set, SeaBASS was expanded with oceanographic and atmospheric data collected by participants in the SIMBIOS Program, under NASA Research Announcements NRA-96 and NRA-99, which has aided considerably in minimizing spatial bias and maximizing data acquisition rates. Archived data include measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties, phytoplankton pigment concentrations, and other related oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as water temperature, salinity, stimulated fluorescence, and aerosol optical thickness. Data are collected using a number of different instrument packages, such as profilers, buoys, and hand-held instruments, and manufacturers on a variety of platforms, including ships and moorings.
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Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) deploys Canadian, state of the art acoustic receivers and oceanographic monitoring equipment in key ocean locations. These are being used to document the movements and survival of marine animals carrying acoustic tags and to document how both are influenced by oceanographic conditions.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock and paleomagnetic data with portals that allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock and paleomagnetic communities and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. It is inherently domain-specific and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
>>>!!!<<< The WDS-Oceanography Catalogue will no longer be updated. For access to all data available through WDS-Oceanography, please go to the NCEI World Ocean Database WODselect https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100011580 or https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/WOD/pr_wod.html. >>>!!!<<< World Data Service for Oceanography is one component of a global network of discipline subcenters that facilitate international exchange of scientific data. Originally established as the World Data Center system during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, the new World Data System continues to function under the guidance of the International Council for Science (ICSU). World Data Service for Oceanography is collocated with, and operated by, the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
The Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB) is a repository for site survey data submitted in support of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) proposals and expeditions. SSDB serves different roles for different sets of users.
The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project is a research and development project focusing on global air-sea heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. The project is committed to produce high-quality, long-term, global ocean surface forcing datasets from the late 1950s to the present to serve the needs of the ocean and climate communities on the characterization, attribution, modeling, and understanding of variability and long-term change in the atmosphere and the oceans. - Links überprüft 14.6.2017 Re