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Found 65 result(s)
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The Ocean Date and Information System provides information on physical, chemical, biological and geological parameters of ocean and coasts on spatial and temporal domains that is vital for both research and operational oceanography. In-situ and remote sensing data are included. The Ocean Information Bank is supported by the data received from Ocean Observing Systems in the Indian Ocean (both the in-situ platforms and satellites) as well as by a chain of Marine Data Centres. Ocean and coastal measurements are available. Data products are accessible through various portals on the site and are largely available by data type (in situ or remote sensing) and then by parameter.
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
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>>>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada is now part of Ocean Networks Canada and this website is being phased out. Please visit us on our new website at oceannetworks.ca >>>!!!<<< NEPTUNE Canada, the North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments, is the world's first regional scale cabled deep ocean observing network. It consists of an 800km network of electro‐optic cable laid on the seabed over the northern Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, off the coast of British Columbia. This tectonic plate serves as an exceptional natural laboratory for ocean observation and experiments. NEPTUNE Canada instruments yield continuous real‐time data and imagery from the ocean surface to beneath the seafloor, and from the coast to the deep sea. They respond to events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, fish migrations, plankton blooms, storms and volcanic eruptions. NEPTUNE Canada offers a unique and exciting approach to ocean science.
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
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The Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS)/Ocean Sciences Division (OSD) data archive contains the holdings of oceanographic data generated by the IOS and other agencies and laboratories, including the Institute of Oceanography at the University of British Columbia and the Pacific Biological Station. The contents include data from B.C. coastal waters and inlets, B.C. continental shelf waters, open ocean North Pacific waters, Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Archipelago.
The CCHDO provides data collection and documentation, primarily from research funded by the NSF. Data and documentation in this database includes research from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, and Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR). Data can be browsed by ocean, time series, project, or map.
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>>>!!!<<<VENUS coastal network, is now part of the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory>>>!!!<<< VENUS is a cabled undersea laboratory for ocean researchers and explorers. VENUS delivers real time information from seafloor instruments via fibre optic cables to the University of Victoria, BC. You can see ocean data live, recent and archived as well as learn more about on-going research
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) is the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) core project responsible for understanding how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations. The programme was initiated by SCOR and the IOC of UNESCO in 1991, to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations comprising a major component of oceanic ecosystems. The aim of GLOBEC is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of the global ocean ecosystem, its major subsystems, and its response to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the responses of the marine ecosystem to global change. U.S. GLOBEC Programm includes the Georges Bank / NW Atlantic Programm, the Northeast Pacific Programm and the Southern Ocean Program.
Seafloor data at these locations include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution scanning altimetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar, seafloor digital photographs, sample locations, deep-towed magnetic data, and more. Each dataset is geospatially registered and incorporates metadata (e.g., sample geochemistry and time and depth of collection) that can be interactively accessed by the user. The user can control which datasets are shown on a map view of the area and the scale at which the map is viewed. Datasets with resolutions inappropriate for the scale at which they are being viewed are automatically removed from the map.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
State of the Salmon provides data on abundance, diversity, and ecosystem health of wild salmon populations specific to the Pacific Ocean, North Western North America, and Asia. Data downloads are available using two geographic frameworks: Salmon Ecoregions or Hydro 1K.
The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) site offers operational data in near-real time and historic contexts. Focus is on tides and currents but also includes information on harmful algal blooms and weather, etc. Data access is made possible through geopspatial web interfaces as well as OPeNDAP services, etc.
The programme "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products.
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Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) deploys Canadian, state of the art acoustic receivers and oceanographic monitoring equipment in key ocean locations. These are being used to document the movements and survival of marine animals carrying acoustic tags and to document how both are influenced by oceanographic conditions.
PISCO researchers collect biological, chemical, and physical data about ocean ecosystems in the nearshore portions of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Data are archived and used to create summaries and graphics, in order to ensure that the data can be used and understood by a diverse audience of managers, policy makers, scientists and the general public.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.