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Found 75 result(s)
The ADAS Project is a self-funding (i.e. funded by participants) project consisting of most major fusion laboratories along with other astrophysical and university groups. As an implementation, it is an interconnected set of computer codes and data collections for modelling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasmas. It can address plasmas ranging from the interstellar medium through the solar atmosphere and laboratory thermonuclear fusion devices to technological plasmas. ADAS assists in the analysis and interpretation of spectral emission and supports detailed plasma models.
AtomDB is an atomic database useful for X-ray plasma spectral modeling. The current version of AtomDB is primarly used for modeing collisional plasmas, those where hot electrons colliding with astrophysically abundant elements and ions create X-ray emission. However, AtomDB is also useful when modeling absorption by elements and ions or even photoionized plasmas, where X-ray photons (often from a simple power-law source) interacting with elements and ions create complex spectra.
STARK-B is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions. This database is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. In addition, it is also devoted to laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. So, the domain of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is wide and depends on the ionization degree of the considered ion. The temperature can vary from several thousands for neutral atoms to several hundred thousands of Kelvin for highly charged ions. The electron or ion density can vary from 1012 (case of stellar atmospheres) to several 1019cm-3 (some white dwarfs and some laboratory plasmas).
At the heart of the Plasma Data Exchange Project is LXcat (pronounced "elecscat"), an open-access website for collecting, displaying, and downloading electron and ion scattering cross sections, swarm parameters (mobility, diffusion coefficient, etc.), reaction rates, energy distribution functions, etc. and other data required for modeling low temperature plasmas. The available data bases have been contributed by members of the community and are indicated by the contributor's chosen title.
The Atomic Data for Astrophysics server provides links to basic atomic data required for calculation of the ionization state of astrophysical plasmas and for quantitative spectroscopy.
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The CDPP is the French national data centre for natural plasmas of the solar system. The CDPP assures the long term preservation of data obtained primarily from instruments built using French resources, and renders them readily accessible and exploitable by the international community. The CDPP also provides services to enable on-line data analysis (AMDA), 3D data visualization in context (3DView), and a propagation tool which bridges solar perturbations to in-situ measurements. The CDPP is involved in the development of interoperability, participates in several Virtual Observatory projects, and supports data distribution for scientific missions (Solar Orbiter, JUICE).
Hourly "Near-Earth" solar wind magnetic field and plasma data, energetic proton fluxes (>1 to >60 MeV), and geomagnetic and solar activity indices. OMNIWeb is part of "Space Physics Data Facility" (https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010168 ).
The Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD) is a collection of atomic and molecular transition parameters of astronomical interest. VALD offers tools for selecting subsets of lines for typical astrophysical applications: line identification, preparing for spectroscopic observations, chemical composition and radial velocity measurements, model atmosphere calculations etc.
This facility permits selective searches of some atomic data files compiled by R. L. Kurucz (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics). The data provided are: - vacuum wavelength (in nm) [above 200 nm calculated using Edlen, Metrologia, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1966]- air wavelength (in nm) above 200 nm- log(gf), - E [in cm-1], j, parity, and configuration for the levels (lower, upper), - information regarding the source of the data. CD-ROM 18 contains the spectrum synthesis programs ATLAS7V, SYNTHE, SPECTRV, ROTATE, BROADEN, PLOTSYN, etc. and sample runs found in directory PROGRAMS; Atomic line data files BELLHEAVY.DAT, BELLLIGHT.DAT, GFIRONLAB.DAT, GULLIVER.DAT, NLTELINES.DAT, GFIRONQ.DAT, obsolete, merged into GFALL, found in directory LINELISTS: Molecular line data files C2AX.ASC, C2BA.ASC, C2DA.ASC, C2EA.ASC, CNAX.ASC, CNBX.ASC, COAX.ASC, COXX.ASC, H2.ASC, HYDRIDES.ASC, SIOAX.ASC, SIOEX.ASC, SIOXX.ASC, found in directory LINELISTS; and my solar flux atlas for test calculations SOLARFLUX.ASC.
A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z ≤ 100), at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.
The Innsbruck Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) DataBase node holds relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment processes of the form: AB + e– –> A– + B, where AB is a molecule. It hence supports querying by various identifiers for molecules and atoms, such as chemical names, stoichiometric formulae, InChI (-keys) and CAS registry numbers. These identifiers are searched both in products and reactants of the processes. It then returns XSAMS files describing the processes found including numeric values for the relative cross sections of the processes. Alternatively, cross sections can be exported as plain ASCII files.
This is a compilation of approximately 923,000 allowed, intercombination and forbidden atomic transitions with wavelengths in the range from 0.5 Å to 1000 µm. It's primary intention is to allow the identification of observed atomic absorption or emission features. The wavelengths in this list are all calculated from the difference between the energy of the upper and lower level of the transition. No attempt has been made to include observed wavelengths. Most of the atomic energy level data have been taken from the Atomic Spectra Database provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
This database contains references to publications that include numerical data, general information, comments, and reviews on atomic line broadening and shifts, and is part of the collection of the NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/grp01/asdc_info.cfm
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GENIE (GENeral Internet search Engine) allows a simultaneous search on multiple databases for spectral and collisional atomic data for fusion and atomic physics research.
Physical Reference Data compiles physical data and biblographic sources: Physical constants, atomic spectroscopy data, molecular spectroscopic data, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray data, nuclear physics data etc.