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Found 17 result(s)
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With the KIT Whole-Body Human Motion Database, we aim to provide a simple way of sharing high-quality motion capture recordings of human whole-body motion. In addition, with the Motion Annotation Tool (https://motion-annotation.humanoids.kit.edu/ ), we aim to collect a comprehensive set of whole-body motions along with natural language descriptions of these motions (https://motion-annotation.humanoids.kit.edu/dataset/).
Collection of various motion capture recordings (walking, dancing, sports, and others) performed by over 140 subjects. The database contains free motions which you can download and use. There is a zip file of all asf/amc's on the FAQs page.
Strong-motion data of engineering and scientific importance from the United States and other seismically active countries are served through the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data(CESMD). The CESMD now automatically posts strong-motion data from an increasing number of seismic stations in California within a few minutes following an earthquake as an InternetQuick Report(IQR). As appropriate,IQRs are updated by more comprehensive Internet Data Reports that include reviewed versions of the data and maps showing, for example, the finite fault rupture along with the distribution of recording stations. Automated processing of strong-motion data will be extended to post the strong-motion records of the regional seismic networks of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) outside California.
The VDC is a public, web-based search engine for accessing worldwide earthquake strong ground motion data. While the primary focus of the VDC is on data of engineering interest, it is also an interactive resource for scientific research and government and emergency response professionals.
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It is the objective of our motion capture database HDM05 to supply free motion capture data for research purposes. HDM05 contains more than three hours of systematically recorded and well-documented motion capture data in the C3D as well as in the ASF/AMC data format. Furthermore, HDM05 contains for more than 70 motion classes in 10 to 50 realizations executed by various actors.
The CMU Multi-Modal Activity Database (CMU-MMAC) database contains multimodal measures of the human activity of subjects performing the tasks involved in cooking and food preparation. The CMU-MMAC database was collected in Carnegie Mellon's Motion Capture Lab. A kitchen was built and to date twenty-five subjects have been recorded cooking five different recipes: brownies, pizza, sandwich, salad, and scrambled eggs.
As a member of SWE-CLARIN, the Humanities Lab will provide tools and expertise related to language archiving, corpus and (meta)data management, with a continued emphasis on multimodal corpora, many of which contain Swedish resources, but also other (often endangered) languages, multilingual or learner corpora. As a CLARIN K-centre we provide advice on multimodal and sensor-based methods, including EEG, eye-tracking, articulography, virtual reality, motion capture, av-recording. Current work targets automatic data retrieval from multimodal data sets, as well as the linking of measurement data (e.g. EEG, fMRI) or geo-demographic data (GIS, GPS) to language data (audio, video, text, annotations). We also provide assistance with speech and language technology related matters to various projects. A primary resource in the Lab is The Humanities Lab corpus server, containing a varied set of multimodal language corpora with standardised metadata and linked layers of annotations and other resources.
EIDA, an initiative within ORFEUS, is a distributed data centre established to (a) securely archive seismic waveform data and related metadata, gathered by European research infrastructures, and (b) provide transparent access to the archives by the geosciences research communities. EIDA nodes are data centres which collect and archive data from seismic networks deploying broad-band sensors, short period sensors, accelerometers, infrasound sensors and other geophysical instruments. Networks contributing data to EIDA are listed in the ORFEUS EIDA networklist (http://www.orfeus-eu.org/data/eida/networks/). Data from the ORFEUS Data Center (ODC), hosted by KNMI, are available through EIDA. Technically, EIDA is based on an underlying architecture developed by GFZ to provide transparent access to all nodes' data. Data within the distributed archives are accessible via the ArcLink protocol (http://www.seiscomp3.org/wiki/doc/applications/arclink).
Science Photo Library (SPL) provides creative professionals with striking specialist imagery, unrivalled in quality, accuracy and depth of information. We have more than 600,000 images and 40,000 clips to choose from, with hundreds of new submissions uploaded to the website each week.
IoT Lab is a research platform exploring the potential of crowdsourcing and Internet of Things for multidisciplinary research with more end-user interactions. IoT Lab is a European Research project which aims at researching the potential of crowdsourcing to extend IoT testbed infrastructure for multidisciplinary experiments with more end-user interactions. It addresses topics such as: - Crowdsourcing mechanisms and tools; - “Crowdsourcing-driven research”; - Virtualization of crowdsourcing and testbeds; - Ubiquitous Interconnection and Cloudification of testbeds; - Testbed as a Service platform; - Multidisciplinary experiments; - End-user and societal value creation; - Privacy and personal data protection.
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
GGOS is the Global Geodetic Observing System of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). It provides observations of the three fundamental geodetic observables and their variations, that is, the Earth's shape, the Earth's gravity field and the Earth's rotational motion. GGOS integrates different geodetic techniques, different models, different approaches in order to ensure a long-term, precise monitoring of the geodetic observables in agreement with the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS). GGOS provides the observational basis to maintain a stable, accurate and global reference frame and in this function is crucial for all Earth observation and many practical applications.
UNAVCO promotes research by providing access to data that our community of geodetic scientists uses for quantifying the motions of rock, ice and water that are monitored by a variety of sensor types at or near the Earth's surface. After processing, these data enable millimeter-scale surface motion detection and monitoring at discrete points, and high-resolution strain imagery over areas of tens of square meters to hundreds of square kilometers. The data types include GPS/GNSS, imaging data such as from SAR and TLS, strain and seismic borehole data, and meteorological data. Most of these can be accessed via web services. In addition, GPS/GNSS datasets, TLS datasets, and InSAR products are assigned digital object identifiers.
SuperDARN is an international HF radar network designed to measure global-scale magnetospheric convection by observing plasma motion in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. This network consists of more than 20 radars operating on frequencies between 8 and 20 MHz that look into the polar regions of Earth. These radars can measure the position and velocity of charged particles in our ionosphere, the highest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, and provide scientists with information regarding Earth's interaction with the space environment.
The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) provides global satellite and lunar laser ranging data and their related products to support geodetic and geophysical research activities as well as IERS products important to the maintenance of an accurate International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). The service develops the necessary global standards/specifications and encourages international adherence to its conventions. The ILRS is one of the space geodetic services of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The ILRS collects, merges, archives and distributes Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) observation data sets of sufficient accuracy to satisfy the objectives of a wide range of scientific, engineering, and operational applications and experimentation.
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The Cognitive Interaction Toolkit provides a unified view on linked research artifacts of collaborating institutions in the Bielefeld University’s strategic research area Interactive Intelligent Systems. It binds together a framework for software integration, software and hardware components, system descriptions, experiments, data sets, and publications. The research artifacts are hosted at a distributed service infrastructure that includes project oriented collaboration platforms, opensource and opendata servers, continuous integration services, and publication data servers. These are accessible via this web catalog defining a central collaborative instance for integrated research efforts.
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IGETS is the International Geodynamics and Earth Tide Service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). The main objective of IGETS is to monitor temporal variations of the Earth gravity field through long‐term records from ground gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. IGETS continues the activities of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) to provide support to geodetic and geophysical research activities using superconducting gravimeter (SG) data within the context of an international network. Furthermore, IGETS continues the activities of the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET), in particular, in collecting, archiving and distributing Earth tide records from long series of gravimeters, tiltmeters, strainmeters and other geodynamic sensors. GFZ is the main Data Center and operates the IGETS data base of worldwide high precision SG records. EOST (Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Strasbourg, France) is the secondary Data Center, The University of French Polynesia (Tahiti) and EOST (Strasbourg, France) are the two current Analysis Centers.