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The NCBI database of Genotypes and Phenotypes archives and distributes the results of studies that have investigated the interaction of genotype and phenotype, including genome-wide association studies, medical sequencing, molecular diagnostic assays, and association between genotype and non-clinical traits. The database provides summaries of studies, the contents of measured variables, and original study document text. dbGaP provides two types of access for users, open and controlled. Through the controlled access, users may access individual-level data such as phenotypic data tables and genotypes.
AmphibiaWeb is an online system enabling any user to search and retrieve information relating to amphibian biology and conservation. This site was motivated by the global declines of amphibians, the study of which has been hindered by the lack of multidisplinary studies and a lack of coordination in monitoring, in field studies, and in lab studies. We hope AmphibiaWeb will encourage a shared vision to collaboratively face the challenge of global amphibian declines and the conservation of remaining amphibians and their habitats.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.