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Found 6 result(s)
The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is a global community of multi-disciplinary scientists unlocking the inner secrets of Earth through investigations into life, energy, and the fundamentally unique chemistry of carbon. Deep Carbon Observatory Digital Object Registry (“DCO-VIVO”) is a centrally-managed digital object identification, object registration and metadata management service for the DCO. Digital object registration includes DCO-ID generation based on the global Handle System infrastructure and metadata collection using VIVO. Users will be able to deposit their data into the DCO Data Repository and have that data discoverable and accessible by others.
AMCSD is an interface to a crystal structure database that includes every structure published in the American Mineralogist, The Canadian Mineralogist, European Journal of Mineralogy and Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, as well as selected datasets from other journals. The database is maintained under the care of the Mineralogical Society of America and the Mineralogical Association of Canada, and financed by the National Science Foundation. You may search by a mineral of your choice, or choose a mineral from a complete list to help aid your research.
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The WURM project is a database of computed Raman and infrared spectra and other physical properties for minerals. The calculations are performed within the framework of the density-functional theory and the density-functional perturbation theory. The database is freely available for teaching and research purposes and is presented in a web-based format, hosted on the http://www.wurm.info web site. It provides the crystal structure, the parameters of the calculations, the dielectric properties, the Raman spectra with both peak positions and intensities and the infrared spectra with peak positions for minerals. It shows the atomic displacement patterns for all the zone-center vibrational modes and the associated Raman tensors. The web presentation is user friendly and highly oriented toward the end user, with a strong educational component in mind. A set of visualization tools ensures the observation of the crystal structure, the vibrational pattern, and the different spectra. Further developments include elastic and optical properties of minerals.
The National Mine Map Repository (NMMR) collects, maintains, and provides U.S. coal and non-coal mine maps to individuals, public and private sectors. NMMR mine maps and data are searchable and indexed by state, county, company name, and mine name. Accessing NMMR mine maps and data requires contacting NMMR. NMMR has a diverse customer population and has provided data to efforts supporting industrial and commercial development, highway construction, and the preservation of public health, safety and welfare.
The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
Including data and software from CrystalEye is this a open-access collection of crystal structures of organic, inorganic, metal-organic compounds and minerals, excluding biopolymers. At present, this is the most comprehensive open resource for small molecule structures, freely available to all scientists in Lithuania and worldwide. Including data and software from CrystalEye, developed by Nick Day at the department of Chemistry, the University of Cambridge under supervision of Peter Murray-Rust.