Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 21 result(s)
Country
RES³T is a digitized version of a thermodynamic sorption database as required for the parametrization of Surface Complexation Models (SCM). It is mineral-specific and can therefore also be used for additive models of more complex solid phases such as rocks or soils. A user interface helps to access selected mineral and sorption data, to convert parameter units, to extract internally consistent data sets for sorption modeling. Data records comprise of mineral properties, specific surface area values, characteristics of surface binding sites and their protolysis, sorption ligand information, and surface complexation reactions
Archiving data and housing geological collections is an important role the Bureau of Geology plays in improving our understanding of the geology of New Mexico. Aside from our numerous publications, several datasets are available to the public. Data in this repository supplements published papers in our publications. Please refer to both the published material and the repository documentation before using this data. Please cite repository data as shown in each repository listing.
The RRUFF Project is creating a complete set of high quality spectral data from well characterized minerals and is developing the technology to share this information with the world. The collected data provides a standard for mineralogists, geoscientists, gemologists and the general public for the identification of minerals both on earth and for planetary exploration.Electron microprobe analysis is used to determine the chemistry of each mineral.
AMCSD is an interface to a crystal structure database that includes every structure published in the American Mineralogist, The Canadian Mineralogist, European Journal of Mineralogy and Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, as well as selected datasets from other journals. The database is maintained under the care of the Mineralogical Society of America and the Mineralogical Association of Canada, and financed by the National Science Foundation. You may search by a mineral of your choice, or choose a mineral from a complete list to help aid your research.
Country
The B.C. Data Catalogue provides the easiest access to government's data holdings, as well as applications and web services. Thousands of the datasets discoverable in the Catalogue are available under the Open Government License - British Columbia.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
SESAR, the System for Earth Sample Registration, is a global registry for specimens (rocks, sediments, minerals, fossils, fluids, gas) and related sampling features from our natural environment. SESAR's objective is to overcome the problem of ambiguous sample naming in the Earth Sciences. SESAR maintains a database of sample records that are contributed by its users. Each sample that is registered with SESAR is assigned an International Geo Sample Number IGSN to ensure its global unique identification.
The Polar Rock Repository is a national facility constructed adjacent to Scott Hall, home of the Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University. It is supported by the National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs. The repository houses rock samples from Antarctica, the Arctic, southern South America and South Africa. The polar rock collection and database includes field notes, photos, maps, cores, powder and mineral residues, thin sections, as well as microfossil mounts, microslides and residues. Rock samples may be borrowed for research by university scientists from anywhere in the world. Samples may also be borrowed for educational or museum use in the United States.
Country
GeoReM is a Max Planck Institute database for reference materials of geological and environmental interest, such as rock powders, synthetic and natural glasses as well as mineral, isotopic, biological, river water and seawater reference materials. GeoReM contains published analytical data and compilation values (major and trace element concentrations and mass fractions, radiogenic and stable isotope ratios). GeoReM contains all important metadata about the analytical values such as uncertainty, analytical method and laboratory. Sample information and references are also included. GeoReM complements the three earthchem databases: GEOROC, NAVDAT and PETDB.
iHUB is a collaborative environment that supports research that relate to the genes and gene networks that control the ionomes, mineral nutrient, and trace element compositions of tissues and organisms. It provides tools to share data, literature, and coordinating collection efforts, among others. It contains ionomic data on more than 200.000 samples.
The USGS Alaska Region has the largest geographic extent of the seven regional units within the USGS and represents a dynamic landscape of great natural wonder. It is a transforming landscape shaped by volcanoes, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers and a strategic landscape of yet untapped mineral and energy resources. The Region conducts research to help inform management of the extensive national parks and wildlife refuges of the far north and the international birds, fish, and marine mammals that migrate to these lands and waters; informs national Arctic energy policy through research on the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf; and provides science to understand, help respond to and mitigate impacts from natural hazards. This work is accomplished in part by the Region's two Science Centers headquartered in Anchorage, the Alaska Science Center and the Volcano Science Center.
The National Mine Map Repository (NMMR) collects, maintains, and provides U.S. coal and non-coal mine maps to individuals, public and private sectors. NMMR mine maps and data are searchable and indexed by state, county, company name, and mine name. Accessing NMMR mine maps and data requires contacting NMMR. NMMR has a diverse customer population and has provided data to efforts supporting industrial and commercial development, highway construction, and the preservation of public health, safety and welfare.
Country
The WURM project is a database of computed Raman and infrared spectra and other physical properties for minerals. The calculations are performed within the framework of the density-functional theory and the density-functional perturbation theory. The database is freely available for teaching and research purposes and is presented in a web-based format, hosted on the http://www.wurm.info web site. It provides the crystal structure, the parameters of the calculations, the dielectric properties, the Raman spectra with both peak positions and intensities and the infrared spectra with peak positions for minerals. It shows the atomic displacement patterns for all the zone-center vibrational modes and the associated Raman tensors. The web presentation is user friendly and highly oriented toward the end user, with a strong educational component in mind. A set of visualization tools ensures the observation of the crystal structure, the vibrational pattern, and the different spectra. Further developments include elastic and optical properties of minerals.
PetDB, the Petrological Database, is a web-based data management system that provides on-line access to geochemical and petrological data. PetDB is a global synthesis of chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical data for rocks, minerals, and melt inclusions. PetDB's current content focuses on data for igneous and metamorphic rocks from the ocean floor, specifically mid-ocean ridge basalts and abyssal peridotites and xenolith samples from the Earth's mantle and lower crust. PetDB is maintained and continuously updated as part of the EarthChem data collections.
The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is a global community of multi-disciplinary scientists unlocking the inner secrets of Earth through investigations into life, energy, and the fundamentally unique chemistry of carbon. Deep Carbon Observatory Digital Object Registry (“DCO-VIVO”) is a centrally-managed digital object identification, object registration and metadata management service for the DCO. Digital object registration includes DCO-ID generation based on the global Handle System infrastructure and metadata collection using VIVO. Users will be able to deposit their data into the DCO Data Repository and have that data discoverable and accessible by others.
InGeoCloudS is an innovative solution for the creation and sharing of environmental data. The project responds to the European INSPIRE Directive requiring public authorities to make all their geological data available via internet. InGeoCloudS will facilitate public and professional access to a large volume of geological data, especially for the study and prevention of natural disasters: earthquake zones, risk of landslides, groundwater conditions. The reliability and flexibility of Cloud architectures will provide scientists with a high-quality, robust and cost-effective service.
The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
Including data and software from CrystalEye is this a open-access collection of crystal structures of organic, inorganic, metal-organic compounds and minerals, excluding biopolymers. At present, this is the most comprehensive open resource for small molecule structures, freely available to all scientists in Lithuania and worldwide. Including data and software from CrystalEye, developed by Nick Day at the department of Chemistry, the University of Cambridge under supervision of Peter Murray-Rust.
Country
The geothermal information system (GeotIS) provides information and data compilations on deep aquifers in Germany relevant for geothermal exploitation. GeotIS is a public internet based information system and satisfies the demand for a comprehensive, largely scale-independent form of a geothermal atlas which can be continuously updated. GeotIS helps users identify geothermal potentials by visualizing temperature, hydraulic properties and depth levels of relevant stratigraphic units. A sophisticated map interface simplifies the navigation to all areas of interest. An additional component contains a catalogue of all geothermal installations in Germany. The primary objective of this project is to improve the quality of geothermal-plant project-planning and the estimation of the exploration risk for geothermal projects on selectable locations. However, concrete, location-specific analyses still remain the task of local feasibility studies.