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Found 26 result(s)
TCIA is a service which de-identifies and hosts a large archive of medical images of cancer accessible for public download. The data are organized as “collections”; typically patients’ imaging related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality or type (MRI, CT, digital histopathology, etc) or research focus. Supporting data related to the images such as patient outcomes, treatment details, genomics and expert analyses are also provided when available.
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ZB MED's Repository for Life Sciences offers authors the chance to publish their scientific texts and research data from the fields of medicine, health, nutritional, environmental and agricultural sciences. In accordance with the principles of Open Access, these publications can be accessed over the Internet without restrictions. There is no charge to publish, archive or use the documents.
!!!!! As of June 30, 2017, HardinMD has been retired, although it is still findable through the WayBack Machine !!!!! Hardin MD was first launched in 1996, as a source to find the best lists, or directories, of information in health and medicine. Hence, the name Hardin MD comes from Hardin Meta Directory, since the site was conceived as a "directory of directories." The Hardin part of our name is from Robert Hardin, a physician at University of Iowa, after whom the library was named.
The SICAS Medical Image Repository is a freely accessible repository containing medical research data including medical images, surface models, clinical data, genomics data and statistical shape models. The data can freely be organized and shared on SMIR and made publicly accessible with a DOI. Dedicated data sets are organized as collections of anatomical regions (e.g Cochlea). The data can be filtered using a modular search and accessed on the web or through the SMIR API.
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BCCM/IHEM is a fungal culture collection specialized in medical and veterinary mycology. About 16.000 strains of yeasts and moulds are available from all over the world: pathogens, allergenic species, strains producing mycotoxins, reference strains, teaching material, etc. It also comprises the Raymond Vanbreuseghem collection and the collection of Janssen Pharmaceutica. The BCCM/IHEM collection makes strains or their genomic DNA publicly available for medical, pharmaceutical and biological research, as well as for method validation, testing or educational purposes. Deposits of strains for public access are free of charge for the depositor. The collection also accept safe and patent deposits, and offers a range of services including trainings in mycology and identifications of strains. Moreover, BCCM/IHEM has expertise in fungal taxonomy, in MALDI-TOF MS identification of moulds and yeasts as well as in genomics (whole genome sequencing of fungal strains, phylogenomics, phylogenetics).
NIAID’s TB Portals Program is a multi-national collaboration for TB data sharing and analysis to advance TB research. As a global consortium of clinicians, scientists, and IT professionals from 40 sites in 16 countries throughout eastern Europe, Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa, the TB Portals Program is a web-based, open-access repository of multi-domain TB data and tools for its analysis. Researchers can find linked socioeconomic/geographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and genomic data from over 7,500 international published TB patient cases with an emphasis on drug-resistant tuberculosis.
>>>!!!<<< As stated 2017-05-16 The BIRN project was finished a few years ago. The web portal is no longer live.>>>!!!<<< BIRN is a national initiative to advance biomedical research through data sharing and online collaboration. It supports multi-site, and/or multi-institutional, teams by enabling researchers to share significant quantities of data across geographic distance and/or incompatible computing systems. BIRN offers a library of data-sharing software tools specific to biomedical research, best practice references, expert advice and other resources.
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Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database is for all who are interested in mutations of the Androgen Receptor Gene. In light of the difficulty in getting new AR mutations published the curator will now accept new mutations that have not been published, provided that it is from a reputable research or clinical laboratory. The curator also strongly suggests that where possible, particularly in the case of new unique mutations that an attempt be made to at least confirm the pathogenicity of the putatative mutation, by showing that the mutation when transfected into a suitable expression system produces a mutant androgen receptor protein.
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BACTIBASE contains calculated or predicted physicochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The information in this database is very easy to extract and allows rapid prediction of relationships structure/function and target organisms of these peptides and therefore better exploitation of their biological activity in both the medical and food sectors.
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The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) contains small molecule pathways found in humans, which are presented visually. All SMPDB pathways include information on the relevant organs, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Accompanying data includes detailed descriptions and references, providing an overview of the pathway, condition or processes depicted in each diagram.
>>>!!!<<< caArray Retirement Announcement >>>!!!<<< The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) instance of the caArray database was retired on March 31st, 2015. All publicly-accessible caArray data and annotations will be archived and will remain available via FTP download https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/UYHeDQ and is also available at GEO http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ . >>>!!!<<< While NCI will not be able to provide technical support for the caArray software after the retirement, the source code is available on GitHub https://github.com/NCIP/caarray , and we encourage continued community development. Molecular Analysis of Brain Neoplasia (Rembrandt fine-00037) gene expression data has been loaded into ArrayExpress: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/experiments/E-MTAB-3073 >>>!!!<<< caArray is an open-source, web and programmatically accessible microarray data management system that supports the annotation of microarray data using MAGE-TAB and web-based forms. Data and annotations may be kept private to the owner, shared with user-defined collaboration groups, or made public. The NCI instance of caArray hosts many cancer-related public datasets available for download.
The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is an NIH-funded research data repository that aims to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. NDAR also serves as a scientific community platform and portal to multiple other research repositories, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data. NDAR combines the function of a data repository, which holds genetic, phenotypic, clinical, and medical imaging data, and the function of a scientific community platform, which defines the standard tools and policies to integrate the computational resources developed by scientific research institutions, private foundations, and other federal and state agencies supporting ASD research. Furthermore, NDAR is working to develop the means to connect relevant repositories together through data federation.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
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The Portal of Genomic Data is an initiative of the National System of Genomic Data (SNDG) of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation of Argentina whose purpose is to visualize, share, disseminate and return to society the primary data that are generated as a result of the investigations financed by the National State. The site allows access to the unified national database of genomic information for all species of ecological, agricultural, biotechnological and health interest; have information from the centers affiliated to the SNDG and their data sets and tools; know the main SNDG statistics; and visualize and / or download the available resources.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than smd.stanford.edu), perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine https://archive.org/web/ . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
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NODE (The National Omics Data Encyclopedia) provides an integrated, compatible, comparable, and scalable multi-omics resource platform that supports flexible data management and effective data release. NODE uses a hierarchical data architecture to support storage of muti-omics data including sequencing data, MS based proteomics data, MS or NMR based metabolomics data, and fluorescence imaging data. Launched in early 2017, NODE has collected and published over 900 terabytes of omics data for researchers from China and all over the world in last three years, 22% of which contains multiple omics data. NODE provides functions around the whole life cycle of omics data, from data archive, data requests/responses to data sharing, data analysis, data review and publish.
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
>>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub mission is now completed. The Cancer Genomics Hub was established in August 2011 to provide a repository to The Cancer Genome Atlas, the childhood cancer initiative Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments and the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative. CGHub rapidly grew to be the largest database of cancer genomes in the world, storing more than 2.5 petabytes of data and serving downloads of nearly 3 petabytes per month. As the central repository for the foundational genome files, CGHub streamlined team science efforts as data became as easy to obtain as downloading from a hard drive. The convenient access to Big Data, and the collaborations that CGHub made possible, are now essential to cancer research. That work continues at the NCI's Genomic Data Commons. All files previously stored at CGHub can be found there. The Website for the Genomic Data Commons is here: https://gdc.nci.nih.gov/ >>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
InnateDB is a publicly available database of the genes, proteins, experimentally-verified interactions and signaling pathways involved in the innate immune response of humans, mice and bovines to microbial infection. The database captures an improved coverage of the innate immunity interactome by integrating known interactions and pathways from major public databases together with manually-curated data into a centralised resource. The database can be mined as a knowledgebase or used with our integrated bioinformatics and visualization tools for the systems level analysis of the innate immune response.
>>>!!!<<< Sorry.we are no longer in operation >>>!!!<<< The Beta Cell Biology Consortium (BCBC) was a team science initiative that was established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It was initially funded in 2001 (RFA DK-01-014), and competitively continued both in 2005 (RFAs DK-01-17, DK-01-18) and in 2009 (RFA DK-09-011). Funding for the BCBC came to an end on August 1, 2015, and with it so did our ability to maintain active websites.!!! One of the many goals of the BCBC was to develop and maintain databases of useful research resources. A total of 813 different scientific resources were generated and submitted by BCBC investigators over the 14 years it existed. Information pertaining to 495 selected resources, judged to be the most scientifically-useful, has been converted into a static catalog, as shown below. In addition, the metadata for these 495 resources have been transferred to dkNET in the form of RDF descriptors, and all genomics data have been deposited to either ArrayExpress or GEO. Please direct questions or comments to the NIDDK Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolic Diseases (DEM).
The EZRC at KIT houses the largest experimental fish facility in Europe with a capacity of more than 300,000 fish. Zebrafish stocks are maintained mostly as frozen sperm. Frequently requested lines are also kept alive as well as a selection of wildtype strains. Several thousand mutations in protein coding genes generated by TILLING in the Stemple lab of the Sanger Centre, Hinxton, UK and lines generated by ENU mutagenesis by the Nüsslein-Volhard lab in addition to transgenic lines and mutants generated by KIT groups or brought in through collaborations. We also accept submissions on an individual basis and ship fish upon request to PIs in Europe and elsewhere. EZRC also provides screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing. Key areas include automation of embryo handling and automated image acquisition and processing. Our platform also involves the development of novel microscopy techniques (e.g. SPIM, DSLM, robotic macroscope) to permit high-resolution, real-time imaging in 4D. By association with the ComPlat platform, we can support also chemical screens and offer libraries with up to 20,000 compounds in total for external users. As another service to the community the EZRC provides plasmids (cDNAs, transgenes, Talen, Crispr/cas9) maintained by the Helmholtz repository of Bioparts (HERBI) to the scientific community. In addition the fish facility keeps a range of medaka stocks, maintained by the Loosli group.
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The Cell Image Library has been merged with "Cell Centered Database" in 2017. The purpose of the database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.