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Found 137 result(s)
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The Data Portal German Marine Research is a product of the Marine Network for Integrated Data Access (MaNIDA) funded cooperatively by the Helmholtz Association and the affiliated universities. The consortium aims to implement a sustainable e-infrastructure for coherent discovery, view, download and dissemination of marine research data.
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LITTERBASE summarises results from 2,046 scientific studies in understandable global maps and figures and opens scientific knowledge on marine litter to the public. In LITTERBASE, we compile information from 2,046 scientific publications on marine litter in a comprehensive data base. This forms the basis of continuously updated maps and figures for policy makers, authorities, scientists, media and the general public on the global amount, distribution and composition of marine litter and its impacts on aquatic life. The portal conveys a broad, fact-based understanding of this environmental problem.
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The Norwegian Marine Data Centre (NMD) at the Institute of Marine Research was established as a national data centre dedicated to the professional processing and long-term storage of marine environmental and fisheries data and production of data products. The Institute of Marine Research continuously collects large amounts of data from all Norwegian seas. Data are collected using vessels, observation buoys, manual measurements, gliders – amongst others. NMD maintains the largest collection of marine environmental and fisheries data in Norway.
The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) provides regular and systematic reference information on the physical and biogeochemical state, variability and dynamics of the ocean and marine ecosystems for the global ocean and the European regional seas. The observations and forecasts produced by the service support all marine applications, including: Marine safety; Marine resources; Coastal and marine environment; Weather, seasonal forecasting and climate. For instance, the provision of data on currents, winds and sea ice help to improve ship routing services, offshore operations or search and rescue operations, thus contributing to marine safety. The service also contributes to the protection and the sustainable management of living marine resources in particular for aquaculture, sustainable fisheries management or regional fishery organisations decision-making process. Physical and marine biogeochemical components are useful for water quality monitoring and pollution control. Sea level rise is a key indicator of climate change and helps to assess coastal erosion. Sea surface temperature elevation has direct consequences on marine ecosystems and appearance of tropical cyclones. As a result of this, the service supports a wide range of coastal and marine environment applications. Many of the data delivered by the service (e.g. temperature, salinity, sea level, currents, wind and sea ice) also play a crucial role in the domain of weather, climate and seasonal forecasting.
Country
The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) is a tropical marine research center. Data are available on topics including reef weather, sea temperature, cyclones, and water quality.
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The Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) is a centre for marine and coastal research. As a partner in various projects and networks it promotes and supports the international image of Flemish marine scientific research and international marine education. In its capacity as a coordination and information platform, the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) supports some thousand marine scientists in Flanders by disseminating their knowledge to policymakers, educators, the general public and scientists.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities. See: https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010914
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
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The Marine Data Archive (MDA) is an online repository specifically developed to independently archive data files in a fully documented manner. The MDA can serve individuals, consortia, working groups and institutes to manage data files and file versions for a specific context (project, report, analysis, monitoring campaign), as a personal or institutional archive or back-up system and as an open repository for data publication.
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GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is one of the leading marine science institutions in Europe. GEOMAR investigates the chemical, physical, biological, and geological processes in the oceans, as well as their interactions with the seafloor and the atmosphere. OceanRep is an open access digital collection containing the research output of GEOMAR staff and students. Included are journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, theses and more, - with fulltext, if available. Research data are linked to the publications entries.
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As the third center for oceanography of the World Data Center following WDC-A of the United States and WDC-B of Russia, WDC-D for oceanography boasts long-term and stable sources of domestic marine basic data. The State Oceanic Administration now has long-term observations obtained from the fixed coastal ocean stations, offshore and oceanic research vessels, moored and drifting buoys. More and more marine data have been available from the Chinese-foreign marine cooperative surveys, analysis and measurement of laboratory samples, reception by the satellite ground station, aerial telemeter and remote sensing, the GOOS program and global ships of opportunity reports, etc; More marine data are being and will be obtained from the ongoing “863” program, one of the state key projects during the Ninth Five-year plan and the seasat No 1 which is scheduled to be launched next year. Through many years’ effort, the WDC-D for oceanography has established formal relationship of marine data exchange with over 130 marine institutions in more than 60 countries in the world and is maintaining a close relationship of data exchange with over 30 major national oceanographic data centers. The established China Oceanic Information Network has joined the international marine data exchange system via Internet. Through these channels, a large amount data have been acquired of through international exchange, which, plus the marine data collected at home for many years, has brought the WDC-D for Oceanography over 100 years’ global marine data with a total data amounting to more than 10 billion bytes. In the meantime, a vast amount of work has been done in the standardized and normalized processing and management of the data, and a series of national and professional standards have been formulated and implemented successively. Moreover, appropriate standards and norms are being formulated as required.
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OGS is recognised as the Italian National Oceanographic Data Centre (OGS-NODC) within the International Oceanographic Data Exchange System of the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) since 27/6/2002. OGS is also listed in EurOcean (Marine Research Infrastructures Database) and in EDMO (European Directory of Marine Organisations). OGS as part of the IOC's network of National Oceanographic Data Centres has designated responsibility for the coordination of data and information management at national level. The oceanographic database covers the fields of marine physics, chemical, biological, underway geophysics and general information on Italian oceanographic cruises and data sets. The main objectives are (revision IODE-XXII, March 2013): -Facilitate and promote the discovery, exchange of, and access to, marine data and information including metadata, products and information in real-time, near real time and delayed mode, through the use of international standards, and in compliance with the IOC Oceanographic Data Exchange Policy for the ocean research and observation community and other stakeholders; - Encourage the long term archival, preservation, documentation, management and services of all marine data, data products, and information; - Develop or use existing best practices for the discovery, management, exchange of, and access to marine data and information, including international standards, quality control and appropriate information technology; - Assist Member States to acquire the necessary capacity to manage marine research and observation data and information and become partners in the IODE network; - Support international scientific and operational marine programmes, including the Framework for Ocean Observing for the benefit of a wide range.
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Data are the key to successful scientific work. A sophisticated data management will guarantee the long-term availability of observational data and metadata, and will allow for an easy data search and retrieval, to supplement the international data exchange and to provide data products for scientific, political, industrial and public stakeholders.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
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As the national oceanographic data centre for Canada, MEDS maintains centralized repositories of some oceanographic data types collected in Canada, and coordinates data exchanges between DFO and recognized intergovernmental organizations, as well as acts as a central point for oceanographic data requests. Real-time, near real-time (for operational oceanography) or historical data are made available as appropriate.
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ICES is an intergovernmental organization whose main objective is to increase the scientific knowledge of the marine environment and its living resources and to use this knowledge to provide unbiased, non-political advice to competent authorities.
The Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS) is a trusted data repository that provides free public access to a curated collection of marine geophysical data products and complementary data related to understanding the formation and evolution of the seafloor and sub-seafloor. Developed and operated by domain scientists and technical specialists with deep knowledge about the creation, analysis and scientific interpretation of marine geoscience data, the system makes available a digital library of data files described by a rich curated metadata catalog. MGDS provides tools and services for the discovery and download of data collected throughout the global oceans. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
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Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) deploys Canadian, state of the art acoustic receivers and oceanographic monitoring equipment in key ocean locations. These are being used to document the movements and survival of marine animals carrying acoustic tags and to document how both are influenced by oceanographic conditions.
Kochi Core Center (KCC) houses one of the 3 Inernationational Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) core repositories, accompanied by images and x-ray CT scanning data viewable by the Virtual Core Library. And it hosts Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) marine core samples and associated analytical data for general scientific or educational uses, after 2 years have passed since collection of core samples.
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The “ Sistema de Observación y Predicción Costero de las Islas Baleares” (SOCIB) - Coastal Ocean Observing and Forecasting System of the Balearic Islands - is a multi-platform distributed and integrated system that provides streams of oceanographic data and modelling services. It supports operational oceanography in a European and international framework and contributes to the needs of marine and coastal research in a global change context. SOCIB coordinates the deployment and data management of a wide range of equipments and models from 8 facilities. It also manages data from external international institutions and collaborates with international aggregators for the dissemination of ocean data.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset