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Seafloor data at these locations include multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution scanning altimetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar, seafloor digital photographs, sample locations, deep-towed magnetic data, and more. Each dataset is geospatially registered and incorporates metadata (e.g., sample geochemistry and time and depth of collection) that can be interactively accessed by the user. The user can control which datasets are shown on a map view of the area and the scale at which the map is viewed. Datasets with resolutions inappropriate for the scale at which they are being viewed are automatically removed from the map.
The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI) is in charge of the elaboration and dissemination of geomagnetic indices, and of tables of remarkable magnetic events, based on the report of magnetic observatories distributed all over the planet, with the help of ISGI Collaborating Institutes. The interaction between the solar wind, including plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, and the Earth's magnetosphere results in a transfer of energy and particles inside the magnetosphere. Solar wind characteristics are highly variable, and they have actually a direct influence on the shape and size of the magnetosphere, on the amount of transferred energy, and on the way this energy is dissipated. It is clear that the great diversity of sources of magnetic variations give rise to a great complexity in ground magnetic signatures. Geomagnetic indices aim at describing the geomagnetic activity or some of its components. Each geomagnetic index is related to different phenomena occurring in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and deep in the Earth in its own unique way. The location of a measurement, the timing of the measurement and the way the index is calculated all affect the type of phenomenon the index relates to. The IAGA endorsed geomagnetic indices and lists of remarkable geomagnetic events constitute unique temporal and spatial coverage data series homogeneous since middle of 19th century.
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The Data Center for Aurora in NIPR is responsible for data archiving and dissemination of all-sky camera observations, visual observations, other optical observations (such as TV and photometric observations), auroral image and particle observations from satellites, geomagnetic observations, and observations of upper atmosphere phenomena associated with aurora such as ULF, VLF and CNA activities. This Data Catalogue summarizes the collection of data sets, data books, related publications and facilities available in the WDC for Aurora as of December 2003. The WDC for Aurora changed its name as "Data Center for Aurora in NIPR" in 2008 due to the disappearance of the WDC panel in ICSU.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.