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The CMU Multi-Modal Activity Database (CMU-MMAC) database contains multimodal measures of the human activity of subjects performing the tasks involved in cooking and food preparation. The CMU-MMAC database was collected in Carnegie Mellon's Motion Capture Lab. A kitchen was built and to date twenty-five subjects have been recorded cooking five different recipes: brownies, pizza, sandwich, salad, and scrambled eggs.
The CAD-60 and CAD-120 data sets comprise of RGB-D video sequences of humans performing activities which are recording using the Microsoft Kinect sensor. Being able to detect human activities is important for making personal assistant robots useful in performing assistive tasks. Our CAD dataset comprises twelve different activities (composed of several sub-activities) performed by four people in different environments, such as a kitchen, a living room, and office, etc. Tested on robots reactively responding to the detected activities.
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
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It is the objective of our motion capture database HDM05 to supply free motion capture data for research purposes. HDM05 contains more than three hours of systematically recorded and well-documented motion capture data in the C3D as well as in the ASF/AMC data format. Furthermore, HDM05 contains for more than 70 motion classes in 10 to 50 realizations executed by various actors.
EM-DAT is a global database on natural and technological disasters, containing essential core data on the occurrence and effects of more than 22,000 disasters in the world, from 1900 to present. EM-DAT provides geographical, temporal, human and economic information on disasters at the country level. The database is compiled from various sources, including UN agencies, non-governmental organisations, insurance companies, research institutes and press agencies.
The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) is an ever-expanding national database of transplantation statistics. Founded in 1987, the registry exists to support the ongoing evaluation of the scientific and clinical status of solid organ transplantation, including kidney, heart, liver, lung, intestine, and pancreas. Data in the registry are collected by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) from hospitals and organ procurement organizations (OPOs) across the country. The SRTR contains current and past information about the full continuum of transplant activity, from organ donation and waiting list candidates to transplant recipients and survival statistics. This information is used to help develop evidence-based policy, to support analysis of transplant programs and OPOs, and to encourage research on issues of importance to the transplant community.
>>>!!! <<< The Epigenomics database was retired on June 1, 2016. All epigenomics data are available in our GEO resource https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo >>> !!! <<< The Epigenomics database provides genomics maps of stable and reprogrammable nuclear changes that control gene expression and influence health. Users can browse current epigenomic experiments as well as search, compare and browse samples from multiple biological sources in gene-specific contexts. Many epigenomes contain modifications with histone marks, DNA methylation and chromatin structure activity. NCBI Epigenomics database contains datasets from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project.
The U.S. Antarctic Program Data Center (USAP-DC) supports investigators funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF http://www.nsf.gov/ ) in documenting, preserving, and disseminating their research results. We register datasets in the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD http://gcmd.nasa.gov/portals/amd/ ) to comply with the Antarctic Treaty (http://www.ats.aq/e/ats.htm ); facilitate submission of datasets to long-term archives; and represent the U.S. in Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/data-products/scadm ) activities. USAP-DC is a member of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA http://www.iedadata.org/ ) and a partner in the Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium (A2DC http://www.a2dc.org/ ).
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The Cell Image Library has been merged with "Cell Centered Database" in 2017. The purpose of the database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.