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Found 21 result(s)
CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC have built the next-generation High Energy Physics (HEP) information system, INSPIRE. It combines the successful SPIRES database content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, with the Invenio digital library technology developed at CERN. INSPIRE is run by a collaboration of CERN, DESY, Fermilab, IHEP, IN2P3 and SLAC, and interacts closely with HEP publishers, arXiv.org, NASA-ADS, PDG, HEPDATA and other information resources. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication, built on successful community-based information systems, and provides a vision for information management in other fields of science.
The Durham High Energy Physics Database (HEPData), formerly: the Durham HEPData Project, has been built up over the past four decades as a unique open-access repository for scattering data from experimental particle physics. It currently comprises the data points from plots and tables related to several thousand publications including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Durham HepData Project has for more than 25 years compiled the Reactions Database containing what can be loosly described as cross sections from HEP scattering experiments. The data comprise total and differential cross sections, structure functions, fragmentation functions, distributions of jet measures, polarisations, etc... from a wide range of interactions. In the new HEPData site (hepdata.net), you can explore new functionalities for data providers and data consumers, as well as the submission interface. HEPData is operated by CERN and IPPP at Durham University and is based on the digital library framework Invenio.
OEDI is a centralized repository of high-value energy research datasets aggregated from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Programs, Offices, and National Laboratories. Built to enable data discoverability, OEDI facilitates access to a broad network of findings, including the data available in technology-specific catalogs like the Geothermal Data Repository and Marine Hydrokinetic Data Repository.
LAMBDA is a part of NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). LAMBDA is a multi-mission NASA center of expertise for cosmic microwave background radiation research. LAMBDA exists to serve the CMB research community, and the greater cosmological research community.
Real-Time Database for high-resolution Neutron Monitor measurements. NMDB provides access to Neutron Monitor measurements from stations around the world. The goal of NMDB is to provide easy access to all Neutron Monitor measurements through an easy to use interface. NMDB provides access to real-time as well as historical data.
SkyView is a Virtual Observatory on the Net generating images of any part of the sky at wavelengths in all regimes from Radio to Gamma-Ray.
The ODIN Portal hosts scientific databases in the domains of structural materials and hydrogen research and is operated on behalf of the European energy research community by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's in-house science service providing independent scientific advice and support to policies of the European Union. ODIN contains engineering databases (Mat-Database, Hiad-Database, Nesshy-Database, HTR-Fuel-Database, HTR-Graphit-Database) and document management sites and other information related to European research in the area of nuclear and conventional energy.
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The database includes world-wide cosmic-ray neutron observations (pressure-corrected 1 hour counts) since 1953. The date are opened in two formats; one is 4096-byte "longformat" data and the other one is 80-byte "cardformat" data. Since the "cardformat" data are prepared only for quick check of data, the "longformat" data, which include information for data usage (constant, factors, etc), should be used for research works. PS files (compressed) of yearly plots are also available.
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The aim of the project KCDC (KASCADE Cosmic Ray Data Centre) is the installation and establishment of a public data centre for high-energy astroparticle physics based on the data of the KASCADE experiment. KASCADE was a very successful large detector array which recorded data during more than 20 years on site of the KIT-Campus North, Karlsruhe, Germany (formerly Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe) at 49,1°N, 8,4°O; 110m a.s.l. KASCADE collected within its lifetime more than 1.7 billion events of which some 425.000.000 survived all quality cuts. Initially about 160 million events are available here for public usage.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
The information accumulated in the SPECTR-W3 ADB contains over 450,000 records and includes factual experimental and theoretical data on ionization potentials, energy levels, wavelengths, radiation transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, and (optionally) the parameters of analytical approximations of electron-collisional cross-sections and rates for atoms and ions. Those data were extracted from publications in physical journals, proceedings of the related conferences, special-purpose publications on atomic data, and provided directly by authors. The information is supplied with references to the original sources and comments, elucidating the details of experimental measurements or calculations, where necessary and available. To date, the SPECTR-W3 ADB is the largest factual database in the world containing the information on spectral properties of multicharged ions.
The Leicester Database and Archive Service (LEDAS) is an easy to use on-line astronomical database and archive access service, dealing mainly with data from high energy astrophysics missions, but also providing full database functionality for over 200 astronomical catalogues from ground-based observations and space missions. The LEDAS also allows access to images, spectra and light curves in graphics, HDS and FITS formats, as well as access to raw and processed event data. LEDAS provides the primary means of access for the UK astronomical community to the ROSAT Public Data Archive, the ASCA Public Data Archive and the Ginga Products Archive by its Archive Network Interface ARNIE.
The Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) is a global community of multi-disciplinary scientists unlocking the inner secrets of Earth through investigations into life, energy, and the fundamentally unique chemistry of carbon. Deep Carbon Observatory Digital Object Registry (“DCO-VIVO”) is a centrally-managed digital object identification, object registration and metadata management service for the DCO. Digital object registration includes DCO-ID generation based on the global Handle System infrastructure and metadata collection using VIVO. Users will be able to deposit their data into the DCO Data Repository and have that data discoverable and accessible by others.
This website aggregates several services that provide access to data of the INTEGRAL Mission. ESA's INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory is detecting some of the most energetic radiation that comes from space. It is the most sensitive gamma-ray observatory ever launched. INTEGRAL is an ESA mission in cooperation with Russia and the United States
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The Astronomical Data Archives Center (ADAC) provides access to astronomical data from all over the world with links to online data catalogs, journal archives, imaging services and data archives. Users can access the VizieR catalogue service as well as the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Data by requesting password access. ADAC also provides access to the SMOKA public science data obtained through the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii as well as Schmidt Telescope at the University of Tokyo & MITSuME and KANATA Telescope at Higashi-Hiroshima Observatory. Users may need to contact the ADAC for password access or create user accounts for the various data services accessible through the ADAC site.
On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy. Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008; SDSS-III 2008-2014; SDSS-IV 2013 ongoing), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. DSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration including the Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Mellon University, the Chilean Participation Group, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, The Johns Hopkins University, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU) / University of Tokyo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (MPA Garching), Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), National Astronomical Observatory of China, New Mexico State University, New York University, The Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, United Kingdom Participation Group, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, University of Arizona, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Portsmouth, University of Utah, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University, and Yale University.
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Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) is dedicated to the collection and worldwide distribution of astronomical data and related information. Alongside data curation and service maintenance responsibilities, the CDS undertakes R&D activities that are fundamental to ensure the long term sustainability in a domain in which technology evolves very quickly. R&D areas include informatics, big data, and development of the astronomical Virtual Observatory (VO). CDS is a major actor in the VO with leading roles in European VO projects, the French Virtual Observatory and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The CDS hosts the SIMBAD astronomical database, the world reference database for the identification of astronomical objects; VizieR, the catalogue service for the CDS reference collection of astronomical catalogues and tables published in academic journals; and the Aladin interactive software sky atlas for access, visualization and analysis of astronomical images, surveys, catalogues, databases and related data.