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Found 16 result(s)
The WRDC, located at the Main Geophysical Observatory in St. Petersburg, Russia, processes solar radiation data currently submitted from more than 500 stations located in 56 countries and operates an archive with more than 1200 stations listed in its catalogue. The WRDC is the central depository of the measured components such as: global, diffuse and direct solar radiation, downward atmospheric radiation, net total and terrestrial surface radiation (upward), spectral radiation components (instantaneous fluxes), and sunshine duration, on hourly, daily or monthly basis.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
The WOUDC processes, archives and publishes world ozone and UV data reported by over 400 stations comprising over 100 international agencies and universities. The World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre (WOUDC) has the two component parts: the World Ozone Data Centre (WODC) and the World Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre (WUDC). These data are available on-line with updates occuring every week and in addition to the on-line archive, data are published annually on CD-ROM, now DVD.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
The NASA/GEWEX SRB project is a major component of the GEWEX radiation research. The objective of the NASA/GEWEX SRB project is to determine surface, top-of-atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes with the precision needed to predict transient climate variations and decadal-to-centennial climate trends.
The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for processing, archiving, and distribution of NASA Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.The ASDC specializes in atmospheric data important to understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities on the climate.
US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Center is a long-term archive and distribution facility for various ground-based, aerial and model data products in support of atmospheric and climate research. ARM facility currently operates over 400 instruments at various observatories (https://www.arm.gov/capabilities/observatories). ARM Data Center (ADC) Archive currently holds over 11,000 data products with a total holding of over 1.5 petabytes of data that dates back to 1993, these include data from instruments, value added products, model outputs, field campaign and PI contributed data. The data center archive also includes data collected by ARM from related program (e.g., external data such as NASA satellite).
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The World Data Centre for Aerosols (WDCA) is the data repository and archive for microphysical, optical, and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosol of the World Meteorological Organisation's (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. The goal of the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme is to ensure long-term measurements in order to detect trends in global distributions of chemical constituents in air and the reasons for them. With respect to aerosols, the objective of GAW is to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of aerosol properties related to climate forcing and air quality on multi-decadal time scales and on regional, hemispheric and global spatial scales.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements are designed to improve understanding of the Earth’s environment and climate. MISR provides radiometrically and geometrically calibrated images in four spectral bands at each of nine widely-spaced angles. Spatial sampling of 275 and 1100 meters is provided on a global basis. All MISR data products are available in HDF-EOS format, and select products are available in netCDF format.
THEREDA (Thermodynamic Reference Database) is a joint project dedicated to the creation of a comprehensive, internally consistent thermodynamic reference database, to be used with suitable codes for the geochemical modeling of aqueous electrolyte solutions up to high concentrations.
The Observatory for Environment Research « Experimental Tropical Watersheds » (SO BVET) is INSU-labeled. It is a monitoring tool that aims to increase our knowledge regarding the continental water and biogeochemical cycles and the dynamics of weathering processes in tropical environments. It is also dedicated to the study of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. These goals are achieve by the combined use of hydrological, geophysical, mineralogical, geochemical methods and modeling.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
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MISTRALS database is a distributed system, that enables users to access datasets produced by all the projects (ChArMEx, HyMeX, MERMex, TerMex, CORSiCA, EMSO and MOOSE) and stored in different data centres. MISTRALS (Mediterranean Integrated STudies at Regional And Local Scales) is a decennial program for systematic observations and research dedicated to the understanding of the Mediterranean Basin environmental process under the planet global change. It aims to coordinate, across the Mediterranean Basin, interdisciplinary research on atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and paleo-climate, including environmental ecology and social sciences. The objective is to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms shaping and influencing landscape, environment and human impact of this eco-region.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.