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Found 68 result(s)
It is an interactive website offering access to genome sequence data from a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and major model organisms, integrated with a large collection of aligned annotations. The Browser is a graphical viewer optimized to support fast interactive performance and is an open-source, web-based tool suite built on top of a MySQL database for rapid visualization, examination, and querying of the data at many levels.
The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
Candida Genome Database, a resource for genomic sequence data and gene and protein information for Candida albicans and related species. CGD is based on the Saccharomyces Genome Database. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) provides online access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the human pathogen Candida albicans and related species. C. albicans is the best studied of the human fungal pathogens. It is a common commensal organism of healthy individuals, but can cause debilitating mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans also serves as a model organism for the study of other fungal pathogens.
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The cisRED database holds conserved sequence motifs identified by genome scale motif discovery, similarity, clustering, co-occurrence and coexpression calculations. Sequence inputs include low-coverage genome sequence data and ENCODE data. A Nucleic Acids Research article describes the system architecture
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
In early 2010 we updated the site to facilitate more rapid transfer of our data to the public database and focus our efforts on the core mission of providing expression pattern images to the research community. The original database http://www.fruitfly.org/index.html reproduced functions available on FlyBase, complicating our updates by the requirement to re-synchronize with FlyBase updates. Our expression reports on the new site still link to FlyBase gene reports, but we no longer reproduce FlyBase functions and therefore can update expression data on an ongoing basis instead of more infrequent major releases. All the functions relating to the expression patterns remain and we soon will add an option to search expression patterns by image similarity, in addition to annotation term searches. In a transitional phase we will leave both the old and the new sites up, but the newer data (post Release 2) will appear only on the new website. We welcome any feedback or requests for additional features. - The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. The genome of SARS-CoV consists of a single, positive-strand RNA that is approximately 29,700 nucleotides long. The overall genome organization of SARS-CoV is similar to that of other coronaviruses. The reference genome includes 13 genes, which encode at least 14 proteins. Two large overlapping reading frames (ORFs) encompass 71% of the genome. The remainder has 12 potential ORFs, including genes for structural proteins S (spike), E (small envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid). Other potential ORFs code for unique putative SARS-CoV-specific polypeptides that lack obvious sequence similarity to known proteins.
The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
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The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
ASAP (a systematic annotation package for community analysis of genomes) is a relational database and web interface developed to store, update and distribute genome sequence data and gene expression data collected by or in collaboration with researchers at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. ASAP was designed to facilitate ongoing community annotation of genomes and to grow with genome projects as they move from the preliminary data stage through post-sequencing functional analysis. The ASAP database includes multiple genome sequences at various stages of analysis, and gene expression data from preliminary experiments.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
This database serves forest tree scientists by providing online access to hardwood tree genomic and genetic data, including assembled reference genomes, transcriptomes, and genetic mapping information. The web site also provides access to tools for mining and visualization of these data sets, including BLAST for comparing sequences, Jbrowse for browsing genomes, Apollo for community annotation and Expression Analysis to build gene expression heatmaps.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
The miRBase database is a searchable database of published miRNA sequences and annotation. Each entry in the miRBase Sequence database represents a predicted hairpin portion of a miRNA transcript (termed mir in the database), with information on the location and sequence of the mature miRNA sequence (termed miR). Both hairpin and mature sequences are available for searching and browsing, and entries can also be retrieved by name, keyword, references and annotation. All sequence and annotation data are also available for download. The miRBase Registry provides miRNA gene hunters with unique names for novel miRNA genes prior to publication of results.
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Xanthobase provides information on Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo), the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogenic bacterium in which genome sequencing has revealed very extensive race differentiation. The whole genome sequence of its native host has also been completed, and analysis of the host parasite interaction on the basis of the two genomes can be expected to be useful.
MycoCosm, the DOE JGI’s web-based fungal genomics resource, which integrates fungal genomics data and analytical tools for fungal biologists. It provides navigation through sequenced genomes, genome analysis in context of comparative genomics and genome-centric view. MycoCosm promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis.
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences.
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The Chickpea Transcriptome Database (CTDB) has been developed with the view to provide most comprehensive information about the chickpea transcriptome, the most relevant part of the genome. The database contains various information and tools for transcriptome sequence, functional annotation, conserved domain(s), transcription factor families, molecular markers (microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms), Comprehensive gene expression and comparative genomics with other legumes. The database is a freely available resource, which provides user scientists/breeders a portal to search, browse and query the data to facilitate functional and applied genomics research in chickpea and other legumes. The current release of database provides transcriptome sequence from cultivated (Cicer arietinum desi (ICC4958) and kabuli (ICCV2)) and wild (Cicer reticulatum, PI489777) chickpea genotypes.
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
The Reference Sequence (RefSeq) collection provides a comprehensive, integrated, non-redundant, well-annotated set of sequences, including genomic DNA, transcripts, and proteins. RefSeq sequences form a foundation for medical, functional, and diversity studies. They provide a stable reference for genome annotation, gene identification and characterization, mutation and polymorphism analysis (especially RefSeqGene records), expression studies, and comparative analyses.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.
!!! GSS sequences are now being merged into the NCBI Nucleotide database !!! The GSS database collects unannotated, short, single-read, primary genomic sequences from GenBank and contains nucleic acid sequences. These sequences include random survey sequences, clone-end sequences, and exon-trapped sequences.