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CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) is a German small satellite mission for geoscientific and atmospheric research and applications, managed by GFZ. With its highly precise, multifunctional and complementary payload elements (magnetometer, accelerometer, star sensor, GPS receiver, laser retro reflector, ion drift meter) and its orbit characteristics (near polar, low altitude, long duration) CHAMP will generate for the first time simultaneously highly precise gravity and magnetic field measurements over a 5 years period. This will allow to detect besides the spatial variations of both fields also their variability with time. The CHAMP mission had opened a new era in geopotential research and had become a significant contributor to the Decade of Geopotentials. In addition with the radio occultation measurements onboard the spacecraft and the infrastructure developed on ground, CHAMP had become a pilot mission for the pre-operational use of space-borne GPS observations for atmospheric and ionospheric research and applications in weather prediction and space weather monitoring. End of the mission of CHAMP was at September 19 2010, after ten years, two month and four days, after 58277 orbits.
The CDAWeb data system enables improved display and coordinated analysis of multi-instrument, multimission data bases of the kind whose analysis is critical to meeting the science objectives of the ISTP program and the InterAgency Consultative Group (IACG) Solar-Terrestrial Science Initiative. The system combines the client-server user interface technology of the World Wide Web with a powerful set of customized IDL routines to leverage the data format standards (CDF) and guidelines for implementation adopted by ISTP and the IACG. The system can be used with any collection of data granules following the extended set of ISTP/IACG standards. CDAWeb is being used both to support coordinated analysis of public and proprietary data and better functional access to specific public data such as the ISTP-precursor CDAW 9 data base that is formatted to the ISTP/IACG standards. Many data sets are available through the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) service and the data coverage continues to grow. These are largely, but not exclusively, magnetospheric data and nearby solar wind data of the ISTP era (1992-present) at time resolutions of approximately a minute. The CDAWeb service provides graphical browsing, data subsetting, screen listings, file creations and downloads (ASCII or CDF). Public data from current (1992-present) space physics missions (including Cluster, IMAGE, ISTP, FAST, IMP-8, SAMPEX and others). Public data from missions before 1992 (including IMP-8, ISIS1/2, Alouette2, Hawkeye and others). Public data from all current and past space physics missions. CDAWeb ist part of "Space Physics Data Facility" (https://www.re3data.org/repository/r3d100010168).
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.