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Found 11 result(s)
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
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The taxonomically broad EST database TBestDB serves as a repository for EST data from a wide range of eukaryotes, many of which have previously not been thoroughly investigated. Most of the data contained in TBestDB has been generated by the labs of the Protist EST Program located in six universities across Canada. PEP is a large interdisciplinaryresearch project, involving six Canadian universities. PEP aims at the exploration of the diversity of eukaryotic genomes in a systematic, comprehensive and integrated way. The focus is on unicellular microbial eukaryotes, known as protists. Protistan eukaryotes comprise more than a dozen major lineages that, together, encompass more evolutionary, ecological and probably biochemical diversity than the multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants and fungi combined. PEP is a unique endeavor in that it is the first phylogenetically-broad genomic investigation of protists.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
UniGene collects entries of transcript sequences from transcription loci from genes or expressed pseudogenes. Entries also contain information on the protein similarities, gene expressions, cDNA clone reagents, and genomic locations.
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FANTOM stands for 'Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome' and is the name of an international research consortium organized by the RIKEN Omics Science Center. The FANTOM5 project aims to build a full understanding of transcriptional regulation in a human system by generating transcriptional regulatory networks that define every human cell type.
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This site provides users with access to up-to-date information about mutations at the phenylalanine hydroxylase locus. Here you will have access to the content of the database in the form of electronic reports. The database is updated manually off-line by the curators to assure that no erroneous information is appended. The curators now also accept data electronically via the submission form.
AmoebaDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for Entamoeba and Acanthamoeba parasites. In its first iteration (released in early 2010), AmoebaDB contains the genomes of three Entamoeba species (see below). AmoebaDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and will rapidly expand to include experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers . The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
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The Pig Expression Data Explorer (PEDE) database system stores full-length cDNA libraries of swine data accesible via keyword and ID searches. Data is publically available, and may specifically interest genetic researchers interested in disease sucsceptibly, and major and minor porcine specific antigens.