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Found 42 result(s)
The goal of this web site is to enable users to easily access ocean science data, run data assimilation models, and visualize both data and models. The concept of OurOcean is to allow users with minimal resource requirements to access data and interact with models.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
MODES focuses on the representation of the inertio-gravity circulation in numerical weather prediction models, reanalyses, ensemble prediction systems and climate simulations. The project methodology relies on the decomposition of global circulation in terms of 3D orthogonal normal-mode functions. It allows quantification of the role of inertio-gravity waves in atmospheric varibility across the whole spectrum of resolved spatial and temporal scales. MODES is compiled by using gfortran although other options have been succesfully tested. The application requires the use of the netcdf and (optionally) grib-api libraries.
Data repository of a meteorological experiment conducted in Perdigão, Portugal between December 15, 2016 to June 15, 2017. The Perdigao field project is part of a larger joint US/European multi-year program in Portugal. The project is partially funded by the European Union (EU) ERANET+ to provide the wind energy sector with more detailed resource mapping capabilities in the form of a new digital EU wind atlas. A major goal of the Perdigão field project is to quantify errors of wind resource models against a benchmark dataset collected in complex terrain. The US participation will complement this activity by identifying physical and numerical weaknesses of models and developing new knowledge and methods to overcome such deficiencies.
CSDMS is a virtual home for a vibrant and growing community of about 1,000 international modeling experts and students who study the dynamic interactions of lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere at Earth’s surface. Participating in cross-disciplinary groups, members develop integrated software modules that predict the movement of water, sediment, and nutrients across landscapes and into the ocean. We share an open library of models, software, and access to high-performance computing. We also share knowledge that helps create higher-resolution simulations, often involving higher complexity algorithms. Together, we support the discovery, use, and conservation of natural resources; mitigation of natural hazards; geotechnical support of commercial and infrastructure development; environmental stewardship; and terrestrial surveillance for global security.
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
The NCAR is a federally funded research and development center committed to research and education in atmospheric science and related scientific fields. NCAR seeks to support and enhance the scientific community nationally and globally by monitoring and researching the atmosphere and related physical and biological systems. Users can access climate and earth models created to better understand the atmosphere, the Earth and the Sun; as well as data from various NCAR research programs and projects. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation in addition to various other U.S. agencies.
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OzFlux provides micro-meteorological measurements from over 500 stations to provide data for atmospheric model testing specific to exchanges of carbon, water vapor and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere.
CESM is a fully-coupled, community, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
Climate4impact: a dedicated interface to ESGF for the climate impact community The portal Climate4impact, part of the ENES Data Infrastructure, provides access to data and quick looks of global and regional climate models and downscaled higher resolution climate data. The portal provides data transformation tooling and mapping & plotting capabilities, guidance, documentation, FAQ and examples.
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The Climate Change Centre Austria - Data Centre provides the central national archive for climate data and information. The data made accessible includes observation and measurement data, scenario data, quantitative and qualitative data, as well as the measurement data and findings of research projects.
Using a combination of remote sensing data and ground observations as inputs, CHG scientists have developed rainfall and other models that reliably predict crop performance in parts of the world vulnerable to crop failure. Policy makers within governments and at non-governmental organizations rely on CHG decision-support products for making critical resource allocation decisions. The CHG's scientific focus is "geospatial hydroclimatology", with an emphasis on the early detection and forecasting of hydroclimatic hazards related to food security droughts and floods. Basic research seeks an improved understanding of the climatic processes that govern drought and flood hazards in FEWS.NET countries. We develop better techniques, algorithms, and modeling applications to use remote sensing and other geospatial data for hazard early warning.
The Space Physics Interactive Data Resource from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center allows solar terrestrial physics customers to intelligently access and manage historical space physics data for integration with environment models and space weather forecasts.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network provides data on ozone depletion and the associated effects on terrestrial and marine systems. Data are collected from 7 sites in Antarctica, Argentina, United States, and Greenland. The network is providing data to researchers studying the effects of ozone depletion on terrestrial and marine biological systems. Network data is also used for the validation of satellite observations and for the verification of models describing the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere.
The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) was developed to support hurricane research. There are three components to TCIS; a global archive of multi-satellite hurricane observations 1999-2010 (Tropical Cyclone Data Archive), North Atlantic Hurricane Watch and ASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft campaign. Together, data and visualizations from the real time system and data archive can be used to study hurricane process, validate and improve models, and assist in developing new algorithms and data assimilation techniques.
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BLLAST is a research programme aimed at exploring the late afternoon transition of the atmospheric boundary layer. The late afternoon period of the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer is poorly understood. This is yet an important transition period that impacts the transport and dillution of water vapour and trace species. The main questions adressed by the project are: - How the turbulence activity fades when heating by the surface decreases? - What is the impact on the transport of chemical species? - How relevant processes can be represented in numerical models? To answer all these questions, a field campaign was carried out during the summer of 2011 (from June 14 to July 8). Many observation systems were then deployed and operated by research teams coming from France and abroad. They were spanning a large spectrum of space and time scales in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the boundary layer processes. The observation strategy consisted in intensifying the operations in the late afternoon with tethered balloons, resarch aircrafts and UAVs.
The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership based at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and a component of the National Space Weather Program. The CCMC provides, to the international research community, access to modern space science simulations. In addition, the CCMC supports the transition to space weather operations of modern space research models.
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
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The COSYNA observatory measures key physical, sedimentary, geochemical and biological parameters at high temporal resolution in the water column and at the sediment and atmospheric boundaries. COSYNA delivers spatial representation through a set of fixed and moving platforms, like tidal flats poles, FerryBoxes, gliders, ship surveys, towed devices, remote sensing, etc.. New technologies like underwater nodes, benthic landers and automated sensors for water biogeochemical parameters are further developed and tested. A great variety of parameters is measured and processed, stored, analyzed, assimilated into models and visualized.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly the National Geophysical Data Center) provide scientific stewardship, products and services for sea floor and lakebed data, including geophysics (gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, bathymetry, water column sonar), and data derived from sediment and rock samples. NCEI compiles coastal and global digital elevation models, high-resolution models for tsunami inundation studies, provides stewardship for NOS data supporting charts and navigation, and is the US national long-term archive for MGG data