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Found 11 result(s)
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
Country
OzFlux provides micro-meteorological measurements from over 500 stations to provide data for atmospheric model testing specific to exchanges of carbon, water vapor and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a new data archive for Earth and environmental science data. ESS-DIVE is funded by the Data Management program within the Climate and Environmental Science Division under the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research program (BER), and is maintained by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. ESS-DIVE will archive and publicly share data obtained from observational, experimental, and modeling research that is funded by the DOE’s Office of Science under its Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) programs within the Environmental Systems Science (ESS) activity. ESS-DIVE will include CDIAC that closed September 30, 2017. >>>!!!<<< March 2018: Some of the CDIAC data has not yet been transferred to ESS-DIVE. Click here http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ to check the CDIAC transition website. >>>!!!<<< The new archive for the CDIAC data will be ESS-DIVE except in the specific cases mentioned below: The Oceanic Trace Gas data have been transitioned to the new Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS) operated by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ocads/. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data have been transitioned to Caltech (http://tccondata.org/). HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) data are transitioning to the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (https://www.eol.ucar.edu/data-software). - ESS-DIVE launched in July 2017, and is currently in the process of implementing a new archive designed to provide long-term stewardship and use of data from observational, experimental and modeling activities in the DOE in the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Programs in the Environmental System Science (ESS) activity.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe measuring atmospheric state variables, like temperature, humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and atmospheric carbon dioxide, on a continuous basis. These measurements serve earth system science by providing inputs into models that predict weather, climate and the cycling of carbon and water. And, they provide information that allows researchers to detect the trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. The eddy covariance method is currently the standard method used by biometeorologists to measure fluxes of trace gases between ecosystems and atmosphere.
TES is the first satellite instrument to provide simultaneous concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor and methane throughout Earth’s lower atmosphere. This lower atmosphere (the troposphere) is situated between the surface and the height at which aircraft fly, and is an important part of the atmosphere that we often impact with our activities.
AmeriFlux is a network of PI-managed sites measuring ecosystem CO2, water, and energy fluxes in North, Central and South America. It was established to connect research on field sites representing major climate and ecological biomes, including tundra, grasslands, savanna, crops, and conifer, deciduous, and tropical forests. As a grassroots, investigator-driven network, the AmeriFlux community has tailored instrumentation to suit each unique ecosystem. This “coalition of the willing” is diverse in its interests, use of technologies and collaborative approaches. As a result, the AmeriFlux Network continually pioneers new ground.
The NCAR is a federally funded research and development center committed to research and education in atmospheric science and related scientific fields. NCAR seeks to support and enhance the scientific community nationally and globally by monitoring and researching the atmosphere and related physical and biological systems. Users can access climate and earth models created to better understand the atmosphere, the Earth and the Sun; as well as data from various NCAR research programs and projects. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation in addition to various other U.S. agencies.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
CARIBIC is an innovative scientific project to study and monitor important chemical and physical processes in the Earth´s atmosphere. Detailed and extensive measurements are made during long distance flights. We deploy an airfreight container with automated scientific apparatus which are connected to an air and particle (aerosol) inlet underneath the aircraft. We use an Airbus A340-600 from Lufthansa since December 2004.
Country
The National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) Program provides accurate and long-term air quality data of a uniform standard across Canada. The NAPS Network has a Canada-Wide database of criteria air contaminants from the early 1970s to the present for designated NAPS sites, as well as provincial, territorial and other sites. Trace contaminants are also monitored at several stations in the network and analyzed by the laboratory at River Road.