Filter

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 21 result(s)
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) provides and collects multi-year continuous data on atmospheric conditions in the Arctic. International Polar Year (IPY) maintains partnerships with Arctic observatories from Sweden, Canada, United States, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. Each IASOA observatory features extensive suites of co-located, research grade active, passive and in-situ observing systems. Atmospheric characteristics of interest are standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances. IASOA operates within boundaries defined by (1) the Arctic (2) the atmosphere (3) the ground-based vantage point (4) data generated by instrument systems and (5) multi-year continuous records to support climate studies.
The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for processing, archiving, and distribution of NASA Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.The ASDC specializes in atmospheric data important to understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities on the climate.
The Barrow, Alaska Observatory (BRW) archives and provides digital access to their findings related to climate change, ozone depletion and baseline air quality. The BRW is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division.
Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) provides data relating to climate change forces and models, ozone depletion and rehabilitation, and baseline air quality. Data are freely available so the public, policy makers, and scientists stay current with long-term atmospheric trends.
Content type(s)
The World Data Centre for Aerosols (WDCA) is the data repository and archive for microphysical, optical, and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosol of the World Meteorological Organisation's (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. The goal of the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme is to ensure long-term measurements in order to detect trends in global distributions of chemical constituents in air and the reasons for them. With respect to aerosols, the objective of GAW is to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of aerosol properties related to climate forcing and air quality on multi-decadal time scales and on regional, hemispheric and global spatial scales.
The Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) provides independent estimates of the global anthropogenic emissions and emission trends, based on publicly available statistics, for the atmospheric modeling community as well as for policy makers. This scientific independent emission inventory is characterized by a coherent world historical trend from 1970 to year x-3, including emissions of all greenhouse gases, air pollutants and aerosols. Data are presented for all countries, with emissions provided per main source category, and spatially allocated on a 0.1x0.1 grid over the globe.
Surface air temperature change is a primary measure of global climate change. The GISTEMP project started in the late 1970s to provide an estimate of the changing global surface air temperature which could be compared with the estimates obtained from climate models simulating the effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance. The continuing analysis updates global temperature change from the late 1800s to the present.
NARSTO is dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. Additionally, NARSTO is working to improve collaboration between the air-quality and health-sciences research communities, to advance understanding of the scientific issues involved in effecting a multi-pollutant/multi-media approach to air quality management, and to increase understanding of the linkages between air quality and climate change. NARSTO is represented by private and public organizations in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. NARSTO was terminated as of December 31, 2010. While data remain available via the original NARSTO Data Archive, the permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center at https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/narsto/narsto_table
The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements are designed to improve understanding of the Earth’s environment and climate. MISR provides radiometrically and geometrically calibrated images in four spectral bands at each of nine widely-spaced angles. Spatial sampling of 275 and 1100 meters is provided on a global basis. All MISR data products are available in HDF-EOS format, and select products are available in netCDF format.
IAGOS aims to provide long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. The observation systems are deployed on a fleet of 10 to 15 commercial aircraft measuring atmospheric chemistry concentrations and meteorological fields. The IAGOS Data Centre manages and gives access to all the data produced within the project.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite measures the ozone layer in our upper atmosphere—tracking the status of global ozone distributions, including the ‘ozone hole.’ It also monitors ozone levels in the troposphere, the lowest layer of our atmosphere. OMPS extends out 40-year long record ozone layer measurements while also providing improved vertical resolution compared to previous operational instruments. Closer to the ground, OMPS’s measurements of harmful ozone improve air quality monitoring and when combined with cloud predictions; help to create the Ultraviolet Index, a guide to safe levels of sunlight exposure. OMPS has two sensors, both new designs, composed of three advanced hyperspectralimaging spectrometers.The three spectrometers: a downward-looking nadir mapper, nadir profiler and limb profiler. The entire OMPS suite currently fly on board the Suomi NPP spacecraft and are scheduled to fly on the JPSS-2 satellite mission. NASA will provide the OMPS-Limb profiler.
The WDCGG archives measurement data for greenhouse and related gases in the atmosphere and the ocean (77 gaseous species as of 31 December 2009). The data are classified into six categories according to the observation platforms or methods used (see WDCGG Data Submission and Dissemination Guide). Air observation at stationary platform Air observation by mobile platforms (e.g. aircraft, ships, etc.) Vertical profile observation of air (e.g. multi-height observation using a tower) Hydrographic sampling observation by ships Ice core observation Observation of surface seawater and overlying air
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
Country
The main objective of the Bolin Centre Database is to ensure the preservation, interoperability and open access of climate research data for members of the Bolin Centre for Climate Research. The Bolin Centre Database also provides expert advice and guidance on data management. The Bolin Centre itself is a multi-disciplinary consortium in Sweden that conducts research and graduate education related to the Earth´s climate, in collaboration between Stockholm University, The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
The ACTRIS DC is designed to assist scientists with discovering and accessing atmospheric data and contains an up-to-date catalogue of available datasets in a number of databases distributed throughout the world. A site like this can never be complete, but we have aimed at including datasets from the most relevant databases to the ACTRIS project, also building on the work and experiences achieved in the EU FP6 research project Global Earth Observation and Monitoring. The focus of the web portal is validated data, but it is also possible to browse the ACTRIS data server for preliminary data (rapid delivery data) through this site. The web site allows you to search in a local metadata catalogue that contains information on actual datasets that are archived in external archives. It is set up so that you can search for data by selecting the chemical/physical variable, the data location, the database that holds the data, the type of data, the data acquisition platform, and the data matrix
The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) program is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks established by NASA and PHOTONS (PHOtométrie pour le Traitement Opérationnel de Normalisation Satellitaire; Univ. of Lille 1, CNES, and CNRS-INSU) and is greatly expanded by networks (e.g., RIMA, AeroSpan, AEROCAN, and CARSNET) and collaborators from national agencies, institutes, universities, individual scientists, and partners. The program provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties for aerosol research and characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with other databases. The network imposes standardization of instruments, calibration, processing and distribution.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.