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Found 16 result(s)
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DEG hosts records of currently available essential genomic elements, such as protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs, among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Essential genes in a bacterium constitute a minimal genome, forming a set of functional modules, which play key roles in the emerging field, synthetic biology.
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SILVA is a comprehensive, quality-controlled web resource for up-to-date aligned ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences from the Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota domains alongside supplementary online services. In addition to data products, SILVA provides various online tools such as alignment and classification, phylogenetic tree calculation and viewer, probe/primer matching, and an amplicon analysis pipeline. With every full release a curated guide tree is provided that contains the latest taxonomy and nomenclature based on multiple references. SILVA is an ELIXIR Core Data Resource.
The Restriction Enzyme Database is a collection of information about restriction enzymes, methylases, the microorganisms from which they have been isolated, recognition sequences, cleavage sites, methylation specificity, the commercial availability of the enzymes, and references - both published and unpublished observations (dating back to 1952). REBASE is updated daily and is constantly expanding.
GOLD is currently the largest repository for genome project information world-wide. The accurate and efficient genome project tracking is a vital criterion for launching new genome sequencing projects, and for avoiding significant overlap between various sequencing efforts and centers.
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The Genome Warehouse (GWH) is a public repository housing genome-scale data for a wide range of species and delivering a series of web services for genome data submission, storage, release and sharing.
WFCC Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (GCM) is expected to be a robust, reliable and user-friendly system to help culture collections to manage, disseminate and share the information related to their holdings. It also provides a uniform interface for the scientific and industrial communities to access the comprehensive microbial resource information.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.
OrtholugeDB contains Ortholuge-based orthology predictions for completely sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes. It is also a resource for reciprocal best BLAST-based ortholog predictions, in-paralog predictions (recently duplicated genes) and ortholog groups in Bacteria and Archaea. The Ortholuge method improves the specificity of high-throughput orthology prediction.
RDP provides quality-controlled, aligned and annotated Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA sequences, and Fungal 28S rRNA sequences, and a suite of analysis tools to the scientific community.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
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GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
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The DSMZ is one of the largest biological ressource centers worldwide.Its collections currently comprise more than 50,000 items, including about 27,000 different bacterial and 4,000 fungal strains, 800 human and animal cell lines, 700 plant cell lines, 1,400 plant viruses and antisera, and 13,000 different types of bacterial genomic DNA.. All biological materials accepted in the DSMZ collection are subject to extensive quality control and physiological and molecular characterization by our central services. In addition, DSMZ provides an extensive documentation and detailed diagnostic information on the biological materials. The unprecedented diversity and quality management of its bioressources render the DSMZ an internationally reknown supplier for science, diagnostic laboratories, national reference centers, as well as industrial partners.
This is CSDB version 1 merged from Bacterial (BCSDB) and Plant&Fungal (PFCSDB) databases. This database aims at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic, NMR spectroscopic and other information on glycan and glycoconjugate structures of prokaryotic, plant and fungal origin. It has been merged from the Bacterial and Plant&Fungal Carbohydrate Structure Databases (BCSDB+PFCSDB). The key points of this service are: High coverage. The coverage for bacteria (up to 2016) and archaea (up to 2016) is above 80%. Similar coverage for plants and fungi is expected in the future. The database is close to complete up to 1998 for plants, and up to 2006 for fungi. Data quality. High data quality is achieved by manual curation using original publications which is assisted by multiple automatic procedures for error control. Errors present in publications are reported and corrected, when possible. Data from other databases are verified on import. Detailed annotations. Structural data are supplied with extended bibliography, assigned NMR spectra, taxon identification including strains and serogroups, and other information if available in the original publication. Services. CSDB serves as a platform for a number of computational services tuned for glycobiology, such as NMR simulation, automated structure elucidation, taxon clustering, 3D molecular modeling, statistical processing of data etc. Integration. CSDB is cross-linked to other glycoinformatics projects and NCBI databases. The data are exportable in various formats, including most widespread encoding schemes and records using GlycoRDF ontology. Free web access. Users can access the database for free via its web interface (see Help). The main source of data is retrospective literature analysis. About 20% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1996) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between the publication of new data and their deposition into CSDB is ca. 1 year. In the scope of bacterial carbohydrates, CSDB covers nearly all structures of this origin published up to 2016. Prokaryotic, plant and fungal means that a glycan was found in the organism(s) belonging to these taxonomic domains or was obtained by modification of those found in them. Carbohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.