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Found 15 result(s)
The British Columbia Conservation Data Centre (CDC) collects and disseminates information on plants, animals and ecosystems at risk in British Columbia. The " BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer" is a source for authoritative conservation information on approximately 7400 plants and animals, and over 600 ecological communities (ecosystems)in British Columbia. Information includes conservation status, legal designation, and ecosection values for ecological communities.
The Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) allows ecosystem scientists to integrate data across disciplines. Data topics include plants and animals, vegetation, terrestrial ecosystem, ecological dynamics, fresh water and estuarine, land surface and soils, agriculture, oceans and coasts, climate, human-nature interactions, and energy, water and gas.
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. iNat is a platform for biodiversity research, where anyone can start up their own science project with a specific purpose and collaborate with other observers.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
Country
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) seeks to enhance the responsible development and use of Canada’s natural resources and the competitiveness of Canada’s natural resources products. We are an established leader in science and technology in the fields of energy, forests, and minerals and metals and use our expertise in earth sciences to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of our landmass.
invasive.org is a project of the University of Georgia’s Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health and one of the four major parts of BugwoodImages. The Focus is on invasive and exotic species of North America. This can be animals, plants, insects, and pathogens. It provides an easily accessible archive of high quality images for use in educational applications. In most cases, the images found in this system were taken by and loaned to us by photographers other than ourselves. Most are in the realm of public sector images. The photographs are in this system to be used.
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
Country
KRISHI Portal is an initiative of Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) to bring its knowledge resources to all stakeholders at one place. The portal is being developed as a centralized data repository system of ICAR consisting of Technology, Data generated through Experiments/ Surveys/ Observational studies, Geo-spatial data, Publications, Learning Resources etc. For implementation of research data management electronically in ICAR Institutes and digitization of agricultural research, KRISHI (Knowledge based Resources Information Systems Hub for Innovations in Agriculture) Portal has been developed as ICAR Research Data Repository for knowledge management. Data Inventory Repository aims at creating Meta Data Inventory through information related to data availability at Institute level. The portal consists of six repositories viz. technology, publication, experimental data, observational data survey data and geo-portal. The portal can be accessed at http://krishi.icar.gov.in. During the period of 2016-17, input data on latitude and longitude of all KVKs under this Zone was submitted to the concerned authority to put them in geo-portal. One brainstorming session was organized at this institute for all scientists on its use and uploading information in portal. As per guidelines of the council, various kinds of publications pertaining to this institute were also uploaded in this portal.
mentha archives evidence collected from different sources and presents these data in a complete and comprehensive way. Its data comes from manually curated protein-protein interaction databases that have adhered to the IMEx consortium. The aggregated data forms an interactome which includes many organisms. mentha is a resource that offers a series of tools to analyse selected proteins in the context of a network of interactions. Protein interaction databases archive protein-protein interaction (PPI) information from published articles. However, no database alone has sufficient literature coverage to offer a complete resource to investigate "the interactome". mentha's approach generates every week a consistent interactome (graph). Most importantly, the procedure assigns to each interaction a reliability score that takes into account all the supporting evidence. mentha offers eight interactomes (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Escherichia coli K12, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) plus a global network that comprises every organism, including those not mentioned. The website and the graphical application are designed to make the data stored in mentha accessible and analysable to all users. Source databases are: MINT, IntAct, DIP, MatrixDB and BioGRID.
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Country
The TERN Data Discovery Portal (TDDP) is a gateway to search and access all the datasets published by Australian Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. In the TERN data discovery portal, users can conduct textual and graphical searches on the metadata catalogue using a web interface with temporal, spatial, and eco science related controlled vocabulary keywords. Requests to download data discovered through the portal are serviced by an individual TERN facility hosting the data. Downloading, using and sharing data will be subjected to the TERN data licensing framework (http://tern.org.au/datalicence).
Country
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.