Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 15 result(s)
Content type(s)
Genome resource samples of wild animals, particularly those of endangered mammalian and avian species, are very difficult to collect. In Korea, many of these animals such as tigers, leopards, bears, wolves, foxes, gorals, and river otters, are either already extinct, long before the Korean biologists had the opportunity to study them, or are near extinction. Therefore, proposal for a systematic collection and preservation of genetic samples of these precious animals was adopted by Korea Science & Engineering Foundation (KOSEF). As an outcome, Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB; www.cgrb.org) was established in 2002 at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University as one of the Special Research Materials Bank supported by the Scientific and Research Infrastructure Building Program of KOSEF. CGRB operates in collaboration with Seoul Grand Park Zoo managed by Seoul Metropolitan Government, and has offices and laboratories at both Seoul National University and Seoul Grand Park, where duplicate samples are maintained, thereby assuring a long-term, safe preservation of the samples. Thus, CGRB is the first example of the collaborative scientific infrastructure program between university and zoo in Korea.
With the creation of the Metabolomics Data Repository managed by Data Repository and Coordination Center (DRCC), the NIH acknowledges the importance of data sharing for metabolomics. Metabolomics represents the systematic study of low molecular weight molecules found in a biological sample, providing a "snapshot" of the current and actual state of the cell or organism at a specific point in time. Thus, the metabolome represents the functional activity of biological systems. As with other ‘omics’, metabolites are conserved across animals, plants and microbial species, facilitating the extrapolation of research findings in laboratory animals to humans. Common technologies for measuring the metabolome include mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can measure hundreds to thousands of unique chemical entities. Data sharing in metabolomics will include primary raw data and the biological and analytical meta-data necessary to interpret these data. Through cooperation between investigators, metabolomics laboratories and data coordinating centers, these data sets should provide a rich resource for the research community to enhance preclinical, clinical and translational research.
iNaturalist is a citizen science project and online social network of naturalists, citizen scientists, and biologists built on the concept of mapping and sharing observations of biodiversity across the globe. iNat is a platform for biodiversity research, where anyone can start up their own science project with a specific purpose and collaborate with other observers.
Country
The goals of FMGP are to: (i) sequence complete mitochondrial genomes from all major fungal lineages, (ii) infer a robust fungal phylogeny, (iii) define the origin of the fungi, their protistan ancestors, and their specific phylogenetic link to the animals, (iv) investigate mitochondrial gene expression, introns, RNAse P RNA structures, mobile elements.
Country
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) seeks to enhance the responsible development and use of Canada’s natural resources and the competitiveness of Canada’s natural resources products. We are an established leader in science and technology in the fields of energy, forests, and minerals and metals and use our expertise in earth sciences to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of our landmass.
Here you will find authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
The Bavarian Natural History Collections (Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns, SNSB) are a research institution for natural history in Bavaria. They encompass five State Collections (zoology, botany, paleontology and geology, mineralogy, anthropology and paleoanatomy), the Botanical Garden Munich-Nymphenburg and eight museums with public exhibitions in Munich, Bamberg, Bayreuth, Eichstätt and Nördlingen. Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. To achieve this we have large scientific collections (almost 35,000,000 specimens), see "joint projects".
Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. The Information Technology Center of the Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns is the institutional repository for scientific data of the SNSB. Its major tasks focus on the management of bio- and geodiversity data using different kinds of information technological structures. The facility guarantees a sustainable curation, storage, archiving and provision of such data.
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
Country
The Ontario Natural Heritage Information Centre (NHIC) compiles, maintains and provides information on rare, threatened and endangered species and spaces in Ontario. This information is stored in a central repository composed of computerized databases, map files and an information library, which are accessible for conservation applications, land use development planning, park management, etc. Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.