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Found 5 result(s)
OpenTopography facilitates community access to high-resolution, Earth science-oriented, topography data, and related tools and resources. The OpenTopography Facility is based at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego and is operated in collaboration with colleagues in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. Core operational support for OpenTopography comes from the National Science Foundation Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities Program (EAR/IF) and the Office of Cyberinfrastructure. In addition, we receive funding from the NSF and NASA to support various OpenTopography related research and development activities.
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Various information, such as xylarium data with wood specimens collected since 1944, atmospheric observation data using the MU radar and other instruments, space-plasma data observed with GEOTAIL satellite, are now combined as Database of Humanosphere and served for public use. Proposals for scientific and technological use are always welcome.
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The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository (LDCR) contains one of the world’s most unique and important collection of scientific samples from the deep sea. Sediment cores from every major ocean and sea are archived at the Core Repository. The collection contains approximately 72,000 meters of core composed of 9,700 piston cores; 7,000 trigger weight cores; and 2,000 other cores such as box, kasten, and large diameter gravity cores. We also hold 4,000 dredge and grab samples, including a large collection of manganese nodules, many of which were recovered by submersibles. Over 100,000 residues are stored and are available for sampling where core material is expended. In addition to physical samples, a database of the Lamont core collection has been maintained for nearly 50 years and contains information on the geographic location of each collection site, core length, mineralogy and paleontology, lithology, and structure, and more recently, the full text of megascopic descriptions.
Geochron is a global database that hosts geochronologic and thermochronologic information from detrital minerals. Information included with each sample consists of a table with the essential isotopic information and ages, a table with basic geologic metadata (e.g., location, collector, publication, etc.), a Pb/U Concordia diagram, and a relative age probability diagram. This information can be accessed and viewed with any web browser, and depending on the level of access desired, can be designated as either private or public. Loading information into Geochron requires the use of U-Pb_Redux, a Java-based program that also provides enhanced capabilities for data reduction, plotting, and analysis. Instructions are provided for three different levels of interaction with Geochron: 1. Accessing samples that are already in the Geochron database. 2. Preparation of information for new samples, and then transfer to Arizona LaserChron Center personnel for uploading to Geochron. 3. Preparation of information and uploading to Geochron using U-Pb_Redux.