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Found 23 result(s)
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the world's largest, on-going telephone health survey system. As a result, surveys were developed and conducted to monitor state-level prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature morbidity and mortality. The basic philosophy was to collect data on actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge, that would be especially useful for planning, initiating, supporting, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention programs. Currently data are collected monthly in all 50 states.
The Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a population consisting of more than 200 inbred lines derived from the Raleigh, USA population. The DGRP is a living library of common polymorphisms affecting complex traits, and a community resource for whole genome association mapping of quantitative trait loci.
The English Lexicon Project (supported by the National Science Foundation) affords access to a large set of lexical characteristics, along with behavioral data from visual lexical decision and naming studies of 40,481 words and 40,481 nonwords.
LSDA contains information, data, studies and materials from medical and biological experiments from the Mercury Project (1961) to current flight, flight analog and ground research. LSDA includes data from NASA's Human Research Program (HRP), NASA’s Space Biology Program (SP), The Human Health and Performance Directorate (HH&P) , and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH)
It is a common platform to deposit, store and share the research data in the area of social and behavioral sciences. openICPSR is undergoing development commiting international archiving standard and is currently free for all users to share their data up to a 2GB limit. It has a distribution network of over 760 institutions, governed by the Attribution 4.0 Creative Commons License and its' data catalog indexed by major search engines. OpenICPSR is a research data-sharing service that allows depositors to rapidly self-publish research data, enabling the public to access the data without charge. Otherwise via standard ICPSR deposits, one can publish and preserve reseach data with restricted-use having nominal charge. ICPSR is part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.
NAHDAP acquires, preserves and disseminates data relevant to drug addiction and HIV research. By preserving and making available an easily accessible library of electronic data on drug addiction and HIV infection in the United States, NAHDAP offers scholars the opportunity to conduct secondary analysis on major issues of social and behavioral sciences and public policy
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative funded under contract HHSS283201500001C with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). CBHSQ has primary responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of SAMHSA's behavioral health data. Public use files and restricted use files are provided. CBHSQ promotes the access and use of the nation's substance abuse and mental health data through SAMHDA. SAMHDA provides public-use data files, file documentation, and access to restricted-use data files to support a better understanding of this critical area of public health.
ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 250,000 files of research in the social and behavioral sciences. It hosts 21 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields. ICPSR advances and expands social and behavioral research, acting as a global leader in data stewardship and providing rich data resources and responsive educational opportunities for present and future generations.
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UQ eSpace is the single authoritative source for the research outputs of the staff and students of the University of Queensland and is the archival home of UQ Research Higher Degree digital theses. UQ eSpace raises the visibility and accessibility of UQ publications to the wider world and provides data for mandatory Government reporting requirements such as the Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) and Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) as well as for the internal UQ systems such as the Q-Index. It also operates as an institutional repository for open access publications, research datasets and other digitised materials created by staff of the University such as print materials, photographs, audio materials, videos, manuscripts and other original works.
The PhenoGen website shares experimental data with a worldwide community of investigators and provides a flexible, integrated, multi-resolution repository of neuroscience transcriptomic genetic data for collaborative research on genomic disorders.
The Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) houses and distributes public research data for a series of studies that focus on the connections within the human brain. These are known as Human Connectome Projects. he Connectome Coordination Facility (CCF) was chartered to help coordinate myriad research projects, harmonize their data, and facilitate the dissemination of results.
The ABCD Data Repository houses all data generated by the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The ABCD Study is supported by NIH partners (the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Cancer Institute, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health), as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Division of Adolescent and School Health. This repository will store data generated by ABCD investigators, serve as a collaborative platform for harmonizing these data, and share those data with qualified researchers.
The OpenNeuro project (formerly known as the OpenfMRI project) was established in 2010 to provide a resource for researchers interested in making their neuroimaging data openly available to the research community. It is managed by Russ Poldrack and Chris Gorgolewski of the Center for Reproducible Neuroscience at Stanford University. The project has been developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.
The Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) is a project of the Population Studies aiming in view to produce a harmonized dataset of U.S. family and fertility surveys spanning five decades (1955-2002). IFSS integrates data from ten underlying component studies of family and fertility encompassing the Growth of American Families (GAF) in 1955 and 1960; National Fertility Surveys (NFS) in 1965 and 1970; as well as National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG) in 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002. The first release contains harmonized sociodemographic variables for all respondents from all ten component studies, including those related to marital status, race and ethnicity, etc. Thus it provides access to researchers, educators, students, policy makers, and others with a data resource to examine issues related to families and fertility in the United States. Potential users can download original/ harmonized datasets (along with documentation) and numerous analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.
Databrary is a data library for researchers to share research data and analytical tools with other investigators. It is a web-based repository for open sharing and preservation of video data and associated metadata in the area of developmental sciences. The project aims to increase the openness in scientific research and dedicated to transforming the culture of developmental science through building a community of researchers empowering them with an unprecedented set of tools for discovery. Databry is complemented by Datavyu (an open source video-coding software) as well as Labnanny (a data management system to enable data-sharing). So any contributor can share raw digital video files, other data streams.
The LISS panel (Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social sciences) is the principal component of the MESS project. It consists of 4500 households, comprising 7000 individuals. The panel is based on a true probability sample of households drawn from the population register by Statistics Netherlands. Households that could not otherwise participate are provided with a computer and Internet connection. A special immigrant panel is available in addition to the LISS panel. This immigrant panel is comprised of around 1600 households (2400 individuals) of which 1100 households (1700 individuals) are of non-Dutch origin. Panel members complete online questionnaires every month of about 15 to 30 minutes in total. They are paid for each completed questionnaire. One member in the household provides the household data and updates this information at regular time intervals.
ClinicalTrials.gov (Clinical trials) is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.
TRAILS is a prospective cohort study, which started in 2001 with population cohort and 2004 with a clinical cohort (CC). Since then, a group of 2500 young people from the Northern part of the Netherlands has been closely monitored in order to chart and explain their mental, physical, and social development. These TRAILS participants have been measured every two to three years, by means of questionnaires, interviews, and all kinds of tests. By now, we have collected information that spans the total period from preadolescence up until young adulthood. One of the main goals of TRAILS is to contribute to the knowledge of the development of emotional and behavioral problems and the (social) functioning of preadolescents into adulthood, their determinants, and underlying mechanisms.
GeneWeaver combines cross-species data and gene entity integration, scalable hierarchical analysis of user data with a community-built and curated data archive of gene sets and gene networks, and tools for data driven comparison of user-defined biological, behavioral and disease concepts. Gene Weaver allows users to integrate gene sets across species, tissue and experimental platform. It differs from conventional gene set over-representation analysis tools in that it allows users to evaluate intersections among all combinations of a collection of gene sets, including, but not limited to annotations to controlled vocabularies. There are numerous applications of this approach. Sets can be stored, shared and compared privately, among user defined groups of investigators, and across all users.
ROSA P is the United States Department of Transportation (US DOT) National Transportation Library's (NTL) Repository and Open Science Access Portal (ROSA P). The name ROSA P was chosen to honor the role public transportation played in the civil rights movement, along with one of the important figures, Rosa Parks. To meet the requirements outlined in its legislative mandate, NTL collects research and resources across all modes of transportation and related disciplines, with specific focus on research, data, statistics, and information produced by USDOT, state DOTs, and other transportation organizations. Content types found in ROSA P include textual works, datasets, still image works, moving image works, other multimedia, and maps. These resources have value to federal, state, and local transportation decision makers, transportation analysts, and researchers.
This project is an open invitation to anyone and everyone to participate in a decentralized effort to explore the opportunities of open science in neuroimaging. We aim to document how much (scientific) value can be generated from a data release — from the publication of scientific findings derived from this dataset, algorithms and methods evaluated on this dataset, and/or extensions of this dataset by acquisition and incorporation of new data. The project involves the processing of acoustic stimuli. In this study, the scientists have demonstrated an audiodescription of classic "Forrest Gump" to subjects, while researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have captured the brain activity of test candidates in the processing of language, music, emotions, memories and pictorial representations.In collaboration with various labs in Magdeburg we acquired and published what is probably the most comprehensive sample of brain activation patterns of natural language processing. Volunteers listened to a two-hour audio movie version of the Hollywood feature film "Forrest Gump" in a 7T MRI scanner. High-resolution brain activation patterns and physiological measurements were recorded continuously. These data have been placed into the public domain, and are freely available to the scientific community and the general public.
The PAIN Repository is a recently funded NIH initiative, which has two components: an archive for already collected imaging data (Archived Repository), and a repository for structural and functional brain images and metadata acquired prospectively using standardized acquisition parameters (Standardized Repository) in healthy control subjects and patients with different types of chronic pain. The PAIN Repository provides the infrastructure for storage of standardized resting state functional, diffusion tensor imaging and structural brain imaging data and associated biological, physiological and behavioral metadata from multiple scanning sites, and provides tools to facilitate analysis of the resulting comprehensive data sets.