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Found 715 result(s)
The sequencing of several bird genomes and the anticipated sequencing of many more provided the impetus to develop a model organism database devoted to the taxonomic class: Aves. Birds provide model organisms important to the study of neurobiology, immunology, genetics, development, oncology, virology, cardiovascular biology, evolution and a variety of other life sciences. Many bird species are also important to agriculture, providing an enormous worldwide food source worldwide. Genomic approaches are proving invaluable to studying traits that affect meat yield, disease resistance, behavior, and bone development along with many other factors affecting productivity. In this context, BirdBase will serve both biomedical and agricultural researchers.
!!!! This information is for reference purposes only. It was current when produced and may now be outdated. Archive material is no longer maintained, and some links may not work. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing this information should contact us at: Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your contact information. Please go to for current information. !!!! HIV and AIDS Costs and Use is the first major research effort to collect information on a nationally representative sample of people in care for HIV infection. Also called the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), the core study is meant to help policymakers in the U.S. make informed decisions on the subject. The study describes the type of therapies available and costs of health care services for people with HIV/AIDS, as well as quality of care, social support, and non-medical services HIV/AIDS patients receive. Supplemental studies examine HIV care delivery in rural areas, prevalence of mental and substance abuse disorders, and other health issues of HIV/AIDS patients.
This database contains individual-based life history data that have been collected from wild primate populations by nine working group participants over a minimum of 19 years.
Since 2003, data concerning material, slides and taxa, existing within the Friedrich Hustedt Diatom centre, are being entered in a database. In 2014, all data from the initial collection database have been transferred into a new system using the EarthCape platform. The web interface of this new system is now on-line but is incomplete. The database stores information on all specimens in the collection, named by Hustedt or deposited later by other workers, with the literature-, material- and slide-information. Taxon names have been entered as they appear on the slides or on a sheet in a slidebox, although in some cases, recently proposed names are given under “comments”. The database also has a complete entry of all of the publications held in the library of the centre, now more than 8,000.
AmphibiaWeb is an online system enabling any user to search and retrieve information relating to amphibian biology and conservation. This site was motivated by the global declines of amphibians, the study of which has been hindered by the lack of multidisplinary studies and a lack of coordination in monitoring, in field studies, and in lab studies. We hope AmphibiaWeb will encourage a shared vision to collaboratively face the challenge of global amphibian declines and the conservation of remaining amphibians and their habitats.
The Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) is a global network of forest research plots committed to the study of tropical and temperate forest function and diversity. The multi-institutional network comprises more than forty forest research plots across the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, with a strong focus on tropical regions. CTFS monitors the growth and survival of about 6 million trees of approximately 10,000 species.
The SICAS Medical Image Repository is a freely accessible repository containing medical research data including medical images, surface models, clinical data, genomics data and statistical shape models. The data can freely be organized and shared on SMIR and made publicly accessible with a DOI. Dedicated data sets are organized as collections of anatomical regions (e.g Cochlea). The data can be filtered using a modular search and accessed on the web or through the SMIR API.
Here you will find authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
e!DAL stands for electronic Data Archive Library. It is a lightweight open source software software framework for publishing and sharing research data. e!DAL was developed based on experiences coming from decades of research data management and has grown towards being a general data archiving and publication infrastructure []. First research data repository is "Plant Genomics and Phenomics Research Data Repository" [].
The Yeast Resource Center provides access to data about mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid arrays, deconvolution florescence microscopy, protein structure prediction and computational biology. These services are provided to further the goal of a complete understanding of the chemical interactions required for the maintenance and faithful reproduction of a living cell. The observation that the fundamental biological processes of yeast are conserved among all eukaryotes ensures that this knowledge will shape and advance our understanding of living systems.
The Plant Organelles Database Version 3 (PODB3) is a specialized database project to promote a comprehensive understanding of organelle dynamics, including organelle function, biogenesis, differentiation, movement, and interactions with other organelles. This database consists of 6 individual parts, 'The Electron Micrograph Database', 'The Perceptive Organelles Database', 'The Organelles Movie Database', 'The Organellome Database', 'The Functional Analysis Database', and 'External Links to other databases and Web pages'. All the data and protocols in these databases are populated by direct submission of experimentally determined data from plant researchers.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
DEEMY is collecting descriptive data on ectomycorrhizae, including extant character descriptions and definitions. Ectomycorrhizae are mutualistic structures formed by fungi and the roots of forest trees. They are predominantly found in the temperate and boreal climate zones but occur also in humid tropic regions, as well as in soils of poor nutrition. Without mycorrhizae, trees would not be able to take up water and minerals. Ectomycorrhizae show a wide range of anatomical diversity which represents their possible function in tree nutrition and ecology. Their anatomical data, in general, allow a quick determination and provide at the same time ecologically important information about possible functions for tree nutrition.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The goal of the Autophagy Database is to provide up-to-date relevant information including protein structure data to researchers of autophagy, and to disseminate important findings to a wider audience so that their ramifications can be appreciated. For this purpose, we strive to make the database to contain as much pertinent information as possible and to make the contents freely available in a user-friendly format.
The DNA Bank Network was established in spring 2007 and was funded until 2011 by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The network was initiated by GBIF Germany (Global Biodiversity Information Facility). It offers a worldwide unique concept. DNA bank databases of all partners are linked and are accessible via a central web portal, providing DNA samples of complementary collections (microorganisms, protists, plants, algae, fungi and animals). The DNA Bank Network was one of the founders of the Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) and is fully merged with GGBN today. GGBN agreed on using the data model proposed by the DNA Bank Network. The Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem (BGBM) hosts the technical secretariat of GGBN and its virtual infrastructure. The main focus of the DNA Bank Network is to enhance taxonomic, systematic, genetic, conservation and evolutionary studies by providing: • high quality, long-term storage of DNA material on which molecular studies have been performed, so that results can be verified, extended, and complemented, • complete on-line documentation of each sample, including the provenance of the original material, the place of voucher deposit, information about DNA quality and extraction methodology, digital images of vouchers and links to published molecular data if available.
It is an interactive website offering access to genome sequence data from a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species and major model organisms, integrated with a large collection of aligned annotations. The Browser is a graphical viewer optimized to support fast interactive performance and is an open-source, web-based tool suite built on top of a MySQL database for rapid visualization, examination, and querying of the data at many levels.
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TrichDB integrated genomic resources for the eukaryotic protist pathogens Trichomonas vaginalis.
The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994.
The CGIAR Research Program No. 6 (CRP6): Forests, Trees and Agroforestry: Livelihoods, Landscapes and Governance aims to enhance the management and use of forests, agroforestry and tree genetic resources across the landscape, from farms to forests.
The BioCyc database collection of Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) provides a reference on the genomes and metabolic pathways of thousands of sequenced organisms. BioCyc PGDBs are generated by software that predict the metabolic pathways of completely sequenced organisms, predict which genes code for missing enzymes in metabolic pathways, and predict operons. BioCyc also integrates information from other bioinformatics databases, such as protein feature and Gene Ontology information from UniProt. The BioCyc website provides a suite of software tools for database searching and visualization, for omics data analysis, and for comparative genomics and comparative pathway questions. From 2016 on, access to the EcoCyc and MetaCyc databases will remain free. Subscriptions to the other 7,600 BioCyc databases will be available to institutions (e.g., libraries), and to individuals. Access to licensed databases via: .
The mission of the platform is to enable access for academic projects towards experiments in high-throughput without loss of IP and on a cost basis, which does not restrict access towards HTS usage. The FMP hosts the central open access technology platform of EU-OPENSCREEN, the ChemBioNet and theHelmholtz-Initiative für Wirkstoffforschung, the Screening Unit. The Unit serves for systematic screening of large compound or genome-wide RNAi libraries with state-of-the-art equipment like automated microscopes and microfluidic systems. The Screening Unit is part of the Chemical Biology Platform of the FMP also supported by the MDC.