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Found 316 result(s)
Content type(s)
ITER contains data in support of human health risk assessments. It is compiled by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and contains data from CDC/ATSDR, Health Canada, RIVM, U.S. EPA, IARC, NSF International and independent parties offering peer-reviewed risk values. ITER provides comparison charts of international risk assessment information and explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
KiGGS is a long-term study conducted by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) on the health of children and adolescents in Germany. The study repeatedly supplies data, representative of the country as a whole, on the health of under 18-year-olds. In addition, the children and adolescents of the first KiGGS study are repeatedly invited, and they continue to be monitored right into their adulthood.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 ( and is expected to take about three years.
The Polar Data Catalogue is an online database of metadata and data that describes, indexes and provides access to diverse data sets generated by polar researchers. These records cover a wide range of disciplines from natural sciences and policy, to health and social sciences.
The Danish Data Archive (DDA) is the national social science data archive. DDA is primaily used by researchers and students wanting access to data materials created by Danish researchers or about Denmark. DDA is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation and dissemination of (primarily) quantitative data created by researchers from social science, health science and history.
The Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS), established in 1988, is a systematic longitudinal study enrolling HIV-infected individuals in Switzerland. It is a collaboration of all Swiss University Hospital infectious disease outpatient clinics, two large cantonal hospitals, all with affiliated laboratories, and with affiliated smaller hospitals and private physicians carrying for HIV patients. The Swiss Mother and Child HIV Cohort Study (MoCHiV) is integrated into the SHCS. It aims at preventing mother to child transmission and enrolls HIV-infected pregnant women and their children. The SHCS involves practically all researchers being active in patient-oriented HIV research in Switzerland. The clinics can delegate recruitment of participants and follow-up visits to other outpatient clinics or to specialized private physicians, provided that the requirements of the protocol can be entirely fulfilled and controlled. The laboratories can contract other laboratories for some of the analyses.
Content type(s)
REGARDS is an observational study of risk factors for stroke in adults 45 years or older. 30,239 participants were recruited between January 2003 and October 2007. They completed a telephone interview followed by an in-home physical exam. Measurements included traditional risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and an echocardiogram of the heart. At six month intervals, participants are contacted by phone to ask about stroke symptoms, hospitalizations and general health status. The study is ongoing and will follow participants for many years.
The Pacific Islands Families (PIF) Study is an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study that has been tracking the health and development of 1,398 Pacific children and their parents since the children were born at Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland in the year 2000. It is the only prospective study specifically of Pacific peoples in the world.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
With its “Blood Donor BIOBANK”, the Bavarian Red Cross (BRK) Blood Donor Service offers a unique and innovative resource for biomarker research: the world’s first blood donor based biobank. Biobanks as collections of biological material together with associated medical data open new possibilities for the development of new targeted diagnostics and therapies. The BRK Blood Donor Service maintains a unique collection of over 3 million blood samples, making it one of the largest sample collections worldwide. Every working day 2,000 new samples are added to the collection.
The population-based cancer registries in each German federal state transfer data to the German Centre for Cancer Registry Data, as required by the Federal Cancer Registry Data Act. These data are combined, quality-checked, analysed and evaluated, and the results published in collaboration with the public health institutions of the federal states.
The National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), or "the Data Bank," is a confidential information clearinghouse created by Congress with the primary goals of improving health care quality, protecting the public, and reducing health care fraud and abuse in the U.S.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) is an ever-expanding national database of transplantation statistics. Founded in 1987, the registry exists to support the ongoing evaluation of the scientific and clinical status of solid organ transplantation, including kidney, heart, liver, lung, intestine, and pancreas. Data in the registry are collected by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) from hospitals and organ procurement organizations (OPOs) across the country. The SRTR contains current and past information about the full continuum of transplant activity, from organ donation and waiting list candidates to transplant recipients and survival statistics. This information is used to help develop evidence-based policy, to support analysis of transplant programs and OPOs, and to encourage research on issues of importance to the transplant community.
The dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation containing data from multiple gene studies. Users can browse data containing the number of variant cells from each study, and filter studies by organism, study type, method and genomic variant. Organisms include human, mouse, cattle and several additional animals. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017 ***
GeneWeaver combines cross-species data and gene entity integration, scalable hierarchical analysis of user data with a community-built and curated data archive of gene sets and gene networks, and tools for data driven comparison of user-defined biological, behavioral and disease concepts. Gene Weaver allows users to integrate gene sets across species, tissue and experimental platform. It differs from conventional gene set over-representation analysis tools in that it allows users to evaluate intersections among all combinations of a collection of gene sets, including, but not limited to annotations to controlled vocabularies. There are numerous applications of this approach. Sets can be stored, shared and compared privately, among user defined groups of investigators, and across all users.
EMDataBank is a global portal for deposition and retrieval of cryo electron microscopy (3DEM) density maps, atomic models and associated metadata. It is a joint effort among investigators of the Protein Databank in Europe (PDBe) at the European Bioinformatics Institute, the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) at Rutgers, and the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) at Baylor College of Medicine.
During cell cycle, numerous proteins temporally and spatially localized in distinct sub-cellular regions including centrosome (spindle pole in budding yeast), kinetochore/centromere, cleavage furrow/midbody (related or homolog structures in plants and budding yeast called as phragmoplast and bud neck, respectively), telomere and spindle spatially and temporally. These sub-cellular regions play important roles in various biological processes. In this work, we have collected all proteins identified to be localized on kinetochore, centrosome, midbody, telomere and spindle from two fungi (S. cerevisiae and S. pombe) and five animals, including C. elegans, D. melanogaster, X. laevis, M. musculus and H. sapiens based on the rationale of "Seeing is believing" (Bloom K et al., 2005). Through ortholog searches, the proteins potentially localized at these sub-cellular regions were detected in 144 eukaryotes. Then the integrated and searchable database MiCroKiTS - Midbody, Centrosome, Kinetochore, Telomere and Spindle has been established.
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The Centre for Applied Genomics hosts a variety of databases related to ongoing supported projects. Curation of these databases is performed in-house by TCAG Bioinformatics staff. The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database, The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database, TThe Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy Mutation and Polymorphism Database are included. Large Scale Genomics Research resources include, the Database of Genomic Variants, The Chromosome 7 Annotation Project, The Human Genome Segmental Duplication Database, and the Non-Human Segmental Duplication Database
The Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) at Tufts Medical Center, with support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), has developed the Systematic Review Data Repository (SRDR), which is a Web-based tool for data extraction and storage of systematic review data. Potential users include patients, policy makers/stakeholders, independent researchers, research centers, and funders of research.
The Alzheimer Disease & Frontotemporal Dementia Mutation Database (AD&FTDMDB) aims at collecting all known mutations in the genes related to Alzheimer disease (AD) and fromtotemporal dementias (FTD). Mutations are collected from the literature and from presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, mutations can be submitted to AD&FTDMDB at this web site.
Content type(s)
The GISAID Initiative promotes the international sharing of all influenza virus sequences, related clinical and epidemiological data associated with human viruses, and geographical as well as species-specific data associated with avian and other animal viruses, to help researchers understand how the viruses evolve, spread and potentially become pandemics. *** GISAID does so by overcoming disincentives/hurdles or restrictions, which discourage or prevented sharing of influenza data prior to formal publication. *** The Initiative ensures that open access to data in GISAID is provided free-of-charge and to everyone, provided individuals identify themselves and agree to uphold the GISAID sharing mechanism governed through its Database Access Agreement. GISAID calls on all users to agree to the basic premise of upholding scientific etiquette, by acknowledging the originating laboratories providing the specimen and the submitting laboratories who generate the sequence data, ensuring fair exploitation of results derived from the data, and that all users agree that no restrictions shall be attached to data submitted to GISAID, to promote collaboration among researchers on the basis of open sharing of data and respect for all rights and interests.
Science3D is an Open Access project to archive and curate scientific data and make them available to everyone interested in scientific endeavours. Science3D focusses mainly on 3D tomography data from biological samples, simply because theses object make it comparably easy to understand the concepts and techniques. The data come primarily from the imaging beamlines of the Helmholtz Center Geesthacht (HZG), which make use of the uniquely bright and coherent X-rays of the Petra3 synchrotron. Petra3 - like many other photon and neutron sources in Europe and World-wide - is a fantastic instrument to investigate the microscopic detail of matter and organisms. The experiments at photon science beamlines hence provide unique insights into all kind of scientific fields, ranging from medical applications to plasma physics. The success of these experiments demands enormous efforts of the scientists and quite some investments
The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.