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Found 135 result(s)
The Global Proteome Machine (GPM) is a protein identification database. This data repository allows users to post and compare results. GPM's data is provided by contributors like The Informatics Factory, University of Michigan, and Pacific Northwestern National Laboratories. The GPM searchable databases are: GPMDB, pSYT, SNAP, MRM, PEPTIDE and HOT.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
The Epigenomics database provides genomics maps of stable and reprogrammable nuclear changes that control gene expression and influence health. Users can browse current epigenomic experiments as well as search, compare and browse samples from multiple biological sources in gene-specific contexts. Many epigenomes contain modifications with histone marks, DNA methylation and chromatin structure activity. NCBI Epigenomics database contains datasets from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project.
Established by the HLA Informatics Group of the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, IPD provides a centralized system for studying the immune system's polymorphism in genes. The IPD maintains databases concerning the sequences of human Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), sequences of the major histocompatibility complex in a number of species, human platelet antigens (HPA), and tumor cell lines. Each subject has related, credible news, current research and publications, and a searchable database for highly specific, research grade genetic information.
The CPTAC Data Portal is the centralized repository for the dissemination of proteomic data collected by the Proteome Characterization Centers (PCCs) for the CPTAC program. The portal also hosts analyses of the mass spectrometry data (mapping of spectra to peptide sequences and protein identification) from the PCCs and from a CPTAC-sponsored common data analysis pipeline (CDAP).
The Toxin and Toxin Target Database is a unique bioinformatics resource that combines detailed toxin data with comprehensive toxin target information. The focus of the T3DB is on providing mechanisms of toxicity and target proteins for each toxin. This dual nature of the T3DB, in which toxin and toxin target records are interactively linked in both directions, makes it unique from existing databases.
The CAD-60 and CAD-120 data sets comprise of RGB-D video sequences of humans performing activities which are recording using the Microsoft Kinect sensor. Being able to detect human activities is important for making personal assistant robots useful in performing assistive tasks. Our CAD dataset comprises twelve different activities (composed of several sub-activities) performed by four people in different environments, such as a kitchen, a living room, and office, etc. Tested on robots reactively responding to the detected activities.
With the creation of the Metabolomics Data Repository managed by Data Repository and Coordination Center (DRCC), the NIH acknowledges the importance of data sharing for metabolomics. Metabolomics represents the systematic study of low molecular weight molecules found in a biological sample, providing a "snapshot" of the current and actual state of the cell or organism at a specific point in time. Thus, the metabolome represents the functional activity of biological systems. As with other ‘omics’, metabolites are conserved across animals, plants and microbial species, facilitating the extrapolation of research findings in laboratory animals to humans. Common technologies for measuring the metabolome include mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), which can measure hundreds to thousands of unique chemical entities. Data sharing in metabolomics will include primary raw data and the biological and analytical meta-data necessary to interpret these data. Through cooperation between investigators, metabolomics laboratories and data coordinating centers, these data sets should provide a rich resource for the research community to enhance preclinical, clinical and translational research.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
The FAIRDOMHub is built upon the SEEK software suite, which is an open source web platform for sharing scientific research assets, processes and outcomes. FAIRDOM (Web Site) will establish a support and service network for European Systems Biology. It will serve projects in standardizing, managing and disseminating data and models in a FAIR manner: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. FAIRDOM is an initiative to develop a community, and establish an internationally sustained Data and Model Management service to the European Systems Biology community. FAIRDOM is a joint action of ERA-Net EraSysAPP and European Research Infrastructure ISBE.
Stemformatics is a collaboration between the stem cell and bioinformatics community. We were motivated by the plethora of exciting cell models in the public and private domains, and the realisation that for many biologists these were mostly inaccessible. We wanted a fast way to find and visualise interesting genes in these exemplar stem cell datasets. We'd like you to explore. You'll find data from leading stem cell laboratories in a format that is easy to search, easy to visualise and easy to export.
DEPOD - the human DEPhOsphorylation Database (version 1.1) is a manually curated database collecting human active phosphatases, their experimentally verified protein and non-protein substrates and dephosphorylation site information, and pathways in which they are involved. It also provides links to popular kinase databases and protein-protein interaction databases for these phosphatases and substrates. DEPOD aims to be a valuable resource for studying human phosphatases and their substrate specificities and molecular mechanisms; phosphatase-targeted drug discovery and development; connecting phosphatases with kinases through their common substrates; completing the human phosphorylation/dephosphorylation network.
TPA is a database that contains sequences built from the existing primary sequence data in GenBank. TPA records are retrieved through the Nucleotide Database and feature information on the sequence, how it was cataloged, and proper way to cite the sequence information.