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Found 181 result(s)
PANDIT is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees. It contains corresponding amino acid and nucleotide sequence alignments, with trees inferred from each alignment. PANDIT is based on the Pfam database (Protein families database of alignments and HMMs), and includes the seed amino acid alignments of most families in the Pfam-A database. DNA sequences for as many members of each family as possible are extracted from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and aligned according to the amino acid alignment. PANDIT also contains a further copy of the amino acid alignments, restricted to the sequences for which DNA sequences were found.
Genome track alignments using GBrowse on this site are featured with: (1) Annotated and predicted genes and transcripts; (2) QTL / SNP Association tracks; (3) OMIA genes; (4) Various SNP Chip tracks; (5) Other mapping fetures or elements that are available.
Introduction of genome-scale metabolic network: The completion of genome sequencing and subsequent functional annotation for a great number of species enables the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks. These networks, together with in silico network analysis methods such as the constraint based methods (CBM) and graph theory methods, can provide us systems level understanding of cellular metabolism. Further more, they can be applied to many predictions of real biological application such as: gene essentiality analysis, drug target discovery and metabolic engineering
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
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While focused on supporting the scientific community, ATCC activities range widely, from repository-related operations to providing specialized services, conducting in-house R&D and intellectual property management. ATCC serves U.S. and international researchers by characterizing cell lines, bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, as well as developing and evaluating assays and techniques for validating research resources and preserving and distributing biological materials to the public and private sector research communities. Our management philosophy emphasizes customer satisfaction, value addition, cost-effective operations and competitive benchmarking for all areas of our enterprise.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
ASAP (a systematic annotation package for community analysis of genomes) is a relational database and web interface developed to store, update and distribute genome sequence data and gene expression data collected by or in collaboration with researchers at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. ASAP was designed to facilitate ongoing community annotation of genomes and to grow with genome projects as they move from the preliminary data stage through post-sequencing functional analysis. The ASAP database includes multiple genome sequences at various stages of analysis, and gene expression data from preliminary experiments.
UniGene collects entries of transcript sequences from transcription loci from genes or expressed pseudogenes. Entries also contain information on the protein similarities, gene expressions, cDNA clone reagents, and genomic locations.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 ( and is expected to take about three years.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
The dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation containing data from multiple gene studies. Users can browse data containing the number of variant cells from each study, and filter studies by organism, study type, method and genomic variant. Organisms include human, mouse, cattle and several additional animals. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017 ***
During cell cycle, numerous proteins temporally and spatially localized in distinct sub-cellular regions including centrosome (spindle pole in budding yeast), kinetochore/centromere, cleavage furrow/midbody (related or homolog structures in plants and budding yeast called as phragmoplast and bud neck, respectively), telomere and spindle spatially and temporally. These sub-cellular regions play important roles in various biological processes. In this work, we have collected all proteins identified to be localized on kinetochore, centrosome, midbody, telomere and spindle from two fungi (S. cerevisiae and S. pombe) and five animals, including C. elegans, D. melanogaster, X. laevis, M. musculus and H. sapiens based on the rationale of "Seeing is believing" (Bloom K et al., 2005). Through ortholog searches, the proteins potentially localized at these sub-cellular regions were detected in 144 eukaryotes. Then the integrated and searchable database MiCroKiTS - Midbody, Centrosome, Kinetochore, Telomere and Spindle has been established.
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The Centre for Applied Genomics hosts a variety of databases related to ongoing supported projects. Curation of these databases is performed in-house by TCAG Bioinformatics staff. The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database, The Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database, TThe Lafora Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy Mutation and Polymorphism Database are included. Large Scale Genomics Research resources include, the Database of Genomic Variants, The Chromosome 7 Annotation Project, The Human Genome Segmental Duplication Database, and the Non-Human Segmental Duplication Database
GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository is a database of fluorescent microscopy images and their associated metadata/experimental parameters. The images depict the localization, co-localization and FRET (fluorescence energy transfer) of proteins in cells, particularly in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Users may download the entire datasets to improve their research.
The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
MicrosporidiaDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the phylum Microsporidia. In its first iteration (released in early 2010), MicrosporidiaDB contains the genomes of two Encephalitozoon species (see below). MicrosporidiaDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and will rapidly expand to include experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers. The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
CORUM is a manually curated dataset of mammalian protein complexes. Annotation of protein complexes includes protein complex composition and other valuable information such as method of purification, cellular function of complexes or involvement in diseases.