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Found 424 result(s)
This library is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.
The Erythron Database is a resource dedicated to facilitating better understanding of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of mammalian erythropoiesis. The resource is built upon a searchable database of gene expression in murine primitive and definitive erythroid cells at progressive stages of maturation.
The server ESTHER (ESTerases and alpha/beta-Hydrolase Enzymes and Relatives) is dedicated to the analysis of proteins or protein domains belonging to the superfamily of alpha/beta-hydrolases, exemplified by the cholinesterases.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
GOBASE is a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts. GOBASE is currently expanding to include information on representative bacteria that are thought to be specifically related to the bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts
This database serves forest tree scientists by providing online access to hardwood tree genomic and genetic data, including assembled reference genomes, transcriptomes, and genetic mapping information. The web site also provides access to tools for mining and visualization of these data sets, including BLAST for comparing sequences, Jbrowse for browsing genomes, Apollo for community annotation and Expression Analysis to build gene expression heatmaps.
Launched in 2000, WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible information concerning the genetics, genomics and biology of C. elegans and some related nematodes. In addition to their curation work, all sites have ongoing programs in bioinformatics research to develop the next generations of WormBase structure, content and accessibility
The Life Science Database Archive maintains and stores the datasets generated by life scientists in Japan in a long-term and stable state as national public goods. The Archive makes it easier for many people to search datasets by metadata (description of datasets) in a unified format, and to access and download the datasets with clear terms of use. In addition, the Archive provides datasets in forms friendly to different types of users in public and private institutions, and thereby supports further contribution of each research to life science.
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
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Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
iHUB is a collaborative environment that supports research that relate to the genes and gene networks that control the ionomes, mineral nutrient, and trace element compositions of tissues and organisms. It provides tools to share data, literature, and coordinating collection efforts, among others. It contains ionomic data on more than 200.000 samples.
GENCODE is a scientific project in genome research and part of the ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) scale-up project. The GENCODE consortium was initially formed as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE project to identify and map all protein-coding genes within the ENCODE regions (approx. 1% of Human genome). Given the initial success of the project, GENCODE now aims to build an “Encyclopedia of genes and genes variants” by identifying all gene features in the human and mouse genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation, and annotating all evidence-based gene features in the entire human genome at a high accuracy.
Tropicos® was originally created for internal research but has since been made available to the world’s scientific community. All of the nomenclatural, bibliographic, and specimen data accumulated in MBG’s electronic databases during the past 30 years are publicly available here.
The Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR) consists of a new panel of over 1700 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Drosophila melanogaster, derived from two highly recombined synthetic populations, each created by intercrossing a different set of 8 inbred founder lines (with one founder line common to both populations). Complete genome sequence data for the founder lines are available, and in addition, there is a high resolution genetic map for each RIL. The DSPR has been developed as a community resource for high-resolution QTL mapping and is intended to be used widely by the Drosophila community.
Candida Genome Database, a resource for genomic sequence data and gene and protein information for Candida albicans and related species. CGD is based on the Saccharomyces Genome Database. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) provides online access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the human pathogen Candida albicans and related species. C. albicans is the best studied of the human fungal pathogens. It is a common commensal organism of healthy individuals, but can cause debilitating mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans also serves as a model organism for the study of other fungal pathogens.
We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
ViPR, the Virus Pathogen Resource, is a publicly available, NIAID-sponsored one-stop database and analysis resource that supports the research of viral pathogens in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists and those causing (re)emerging infectious diseases. ViPR integrates data from external sources (GenBank, UniProt, Immune Epitope Database, Protein Data Bank, etc.), direct submissions, and internal curation and analysis pipelines, and provides a suite of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools to expedite virology research.
Content type(s)
Biobanks are a key prerequisite for modern medical research. By linking samples and clinical data they make it possible to clarify the causes and the course of diseases. The German Biobank Registry pools the medically relevant biobanks in Germany. The German Biobank Registry provides an overview of the medical biobanks in Germany; increases the international visibility of German biobanks; facilitates the networking of biobanks; promotes an exchange of information and samples between research teams; supports the use of existing resources; provides information for investments in biobanks and promotes transparency and trust in research where human samples are used. Searching for samples in all biobanks is possible at the project portal (P2B2) after registration.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
The cisRED database holds conserved sequence motifs identified by genome scale motif discovery, similarity, clustering, co-occurrence and coexpression calculations. Sequence inputs include low-coverage genome sequence data and ENCODE data. A Nucleic Acids Research article describes the system architecture
Xenbase's mission is to provide the international research community with a comprehensive, integrated and easy to use web based resource that gives access the diverse and rich genomic, expression and functional data available from Xenopus research. Xenbase also provides a critical data sharing infrastructure for many other NIH-funded projects, and is a focal point for the Xenopus community. In addition to our primary goal of supporting Xenopus researchers, Xenbase enhances the availability and visibility of Xenopus data to the broader biomedical research community.