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Found 129 result(s)
Currently, the IMS repository focuses on resources provided by the Institute for Natural Language Processing in Stuttgart (IMS) and other CLARIN-D related institutions such as the local Collaborative Research Centre 732 (SFB 732) as well as institutions and/or organizations that belong to the CLARIN-D extended scientific community. Comprehensive guidelines and workflows for submission by external contributors are being compiled based on the experiences in archiving such in-house resources.
GloPAD is a multimedia, multilingual, web-accessible database containing digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects (such as 3-D images) related to the performing arts from around the world. GloPAD (Global Performing Arts Database) records include authoritative, detailed, multilingual descriptions of digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects related to the performing arts around the world, plus information about related pieces, productions, performers, and creators. GloPAC is an international organization of institutions and individuals committed to using innovative digital technologies to create easily accessible, multimedia, and multilingual information resources for the study and preservation of the performing arts.
The ADS is an accredited digital repository for heritage data that supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources by preserving and disseminating digital data in the long term. The ADS also promotes good practice in the use of digital data, provides technical advice to the heritage community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
CLARIN is a European Research Infrastructure for the Humanities and Social Sciences, focusing on language resources (data and tools). It is being implemented and constantly improved at leading institutions in a large and growing number of European countries, aiming at improving Europe's multi-linguality competence. CLARIN provides several services, such as access to language data and tools to analyze data, and offers to deposit research data, as well as direct access to knowledge about relevant topics in relation to (research on and with) language resources. The main tool is the 'Virtual Language Observatory' providing metadata and access to the different national CLARIN centers and their data.
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heidICON is provided by Heidelberg University Library and is the "Virtual Slide Collection" in progress of organization of Heidelberg University. In addition to record graphic material on current interest for research and teaching, the University departments and institutes can digitize and transfer their already existing slide collections.
The Digital Collections repository is a service that provides free and open access to the scholarship and creative works produced and owned by the Texas State University community. The Wittliff Collections, located on the seventh floor of the Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University, was founded by William D. Wittliff in 1987. The Wittliff Collections include 2 collections. 1. The Southwestern Writers Collection: These Collection holds the papers of numerous 20th century writers and the Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection. The film holdings contain over 500 film and television screenplays as well as complete production archives for several popular films, including the television miniseries Lonesome Dove. The music holdings represent the breadth and scope of popular Texas sounds. 2. Mexican Photography Collection: The Southwestern & Mexican Photography Collection assembles a broad range of photographic work from the Southwestern United States and Mexico, from the 19th-century to the present day.
LINDAT/CLARIN is designed as a Czech “node” of Clarin ERIC (Common Language Resources and Technology Infrastructure). It also supports the goals of the META-NET language technology network. Both networks aim at collection, annotation, development and free sharing of language data and basic technologies between institutions and individuals both in science and in all types of research. The Clarin ERIC infrastructural project is more focused on humanities, while META-NET aims at the development of language technologies and applications. The data stored in the repository are already being used in scientific publications in the Czech Republic.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
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Research Data Finder is QUT’s discovery service for research data created or collected by QUT researchers. Designed to promote the visibility of QUT research datasets, Research Data Finder provides descriptions about shareable, reusable datasets available via open or mediated access.
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Kinsources is an open and interactive platform to archive, share, analyze and compare kinship data used in scientific research. Kinsources is not just another genealogy website, but a peer-reviewed repository designed for comparative and collaborative research. The aim of Kinsources is to provide kinship studies with a large and solid empirical base. Kinsources combines the functionality of communal data repository with a toolbox providing researchers with advanced software for analyzing kinship data. The software Puck (Program for the Use and Computation of Kinship data) is integrated in the statistical package and the search engine of the Kinsources website. Kinsources is part of a research perspective that seeks to understand the interaction between genealogy, terminology and space in the emergence of kinship structures. Hosted by the TGIR HumaNum, the platform ensures both security and free access to the scientific data is validated by the research community.
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Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
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ScholarBank@NUS is the university's Institutional Repository (IR). Its goals are to collect, preserve and showcase the research output including research data of NUS researchers and departments.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The TextGrid Repository is a digital preservation archive for human sciences research data. It offers an extensive searchable and adaptable corpus of XML/TEI encoded texts, pictures and databases. Amongst the continuously growing corpus is the Digital Library of TextGrid, which consists of works of more than 600 authors of German fiction (prose, verse and drama), as well as nonfiction from the beginning of the printing press to the early 20th century. The files are saved in different output formats (XML, ePub, PDF), published and made searchable. Different tools e.g. viewing or quantitative text-analysis tools can be used for visualization or to further research the text. The TextGrid Repository is part of the virtual research environment TextGrid, which besides offering digital preservation also offers open-source software for collaborative creations and publications of e.g. digital editions that are based on XML/TEI.
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In addition to the common documentation methods of cylinder seals by rolled impression and photography, this collection also offers 3D-models and digital impressions. The 3D-scans can be performed without impacting the objects, thus reducing the risks. This method allows even the most fragile of seals to be documented, including those too delicate to be used for a rolled impression. These scans offer a true-to-scale reproduction of the seals.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The History Data Service data collection brings together over 650 separate studies transcribed, scanned or compiled from historical sources. The studies cover a wide range of historical topics, from the seventh century to the twentieth century. Although the primary focus of the collection is on the United Kingdom, it also includes a significant body of cross-national and international data collections. Examples of topics covered include: nineteenth and twentieth century statistics, manuscript census records, state finance data, demographic data, mortality data, community histories, electoral history and economic indicators.
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The Australian National Corpus collates and provides access to assorted examples of Australian English text, transcriptions, audio and audio-visual materials. Text analysis tools are embedded in the interface allowing analysis and downloads in *.CSV format.
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.
Sandrart.net: A net-based research platform on the history of art and culture in the 17th century. The project’s main goal was an annotated, enriched and web-based edition of Joachim von Sandrart’s Teutscher Academie der Edlen Bau, Bild- und Mahlerey-Künste (1675–80), one of the most important source texts of the early modern period. Having lived and worked in a number of places throughout Europe, Sandrart’s biographical background makes his writings (with first-hand narrations on art, artists and art collections) a work of European dimension.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The CLARIN Centre at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, hosts and manages a data repository (CLARIN-DK-UCPH Repository), which is part of a research infrastructure for humanities and social sciences financed by the University of Copenhagen, and a part of the national infrastructure collaboration DIGHUMLAB in Denmark. The CLARIN-DK-UCPH Repository provides easy and sustainable access for scholars in the humanities and social sciences to digital language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form) and provides advanced tools for discovering, exploring, exploiting, annotating, and analyzing data. CLARIN-DK also shares knowledge on Danish language technology and resources and is the Danish node in the European Research Infrastructure Consortium, CLARIN ERIC.