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Found 26 result(s)
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
The Research Collection is ETH Zurich's publication platform. It unites the functions of a university bibliography, an open access repository and a research data repository within one platform. Researchers who are affiliated with ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, may deposit research data from all domains. They can publish data as a standalone publication, publish it as supplementary material for an article, dissertation or another text, share it with colleagues or a research group, or deposit it for archiving purposes. Research-data-specific features include flexible access rights settings, DOI registration and a DOI preview workflow, content previews for zip- and tar-containers, as well as download statistics and altmetrics for published data. All data uploaded to the Research Collection are also transferred to the ETH Data Archive, ETH Zurich’s long-term archive.
The UWA Research Repository contains research publications, research datasets and theses created by researchers and postgraduates affiliated with UWA. It is managed by the University Library and provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Dataset metadata is harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
The Alberta Food Composition Database (AFCDB) is the first comprehensive resource on food constituents, chemistry and biology dedicated to major Alberta-grown produce. It provides information on both macronutrients and micronutrients, including many of the constituents that give foods their flavor, color, taste, texture and aroma. Users can view the contents of the AFCDB from the “FoodView” (listing foods by their chemical composition) or the “ChemView” (listing chemicals by their food sources).
In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32,, funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
RADAR service offers the ability to search for research data descriptions of the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke). The service includes descriptions of research data for agriculture, forestry and food sectors, game management, fisheries and environment. The public web service aims to facilitate discovering subjects of natural resources studies. In addition to Luke's research data descriptions one can search metadata of the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). The interface between Luke and SYKE metadata services combines Luke's research data descriptions and SYKE's descriptions of spatial datasets and data systems into a unified search service.
Ecological Archives publishes materials that are supplemental to articles that appear in the ESA journals (Ecology, Ecological Applications, Ecological Monographs, Ecosphere, Ecosystem Health and Sustainability and Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America), as well as peer-reviewed data papers with abstracts published in the printed journals. Three kinds of publications appear in Ecological Archives: appendices, supplements, and data papers.
Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: - Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. - A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. - Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: -- we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
The Global Agricultural Trial Repository (AgTrials) provides access to a database on the performance of agricultural technologies at sites across the developing world. It builds on decades of evaluation trials, mostly of varieties, but includes any agricultural technology for developing world farmers. It aims to facilitate the subsequent analysis on the performance of agricultural technologies under a changing climate and to form the basis for improving models of agricultural production under current and future conditions, and for evaluating the efficacy of trialed materials for adaptation.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
The Open Science Framework (OSF) is part network of research materials, part version control system, and part collaboration software. The purpose of the software is to support the scientist's workflow and help increase the alignment between scientific values and scientific practices. Document and archive studies. Move the organization and management of study materials from the desktop into the cloud. Labs can organize, share, and archive study materials among team members. Web-based project management reduces the likelihood of losing study materials due to computer malfunction, changing personnel, or just forgetting where you put the damn thing. Share and find materials. With a click, make study materials public so that other researchers can find, use and cite them. Find materials by other researchers to avoid reinventing something that already exists. Detail individual contribution. Assign citable, contributor credit to any research material - tools, analysis scripts, methods, measures, data. Increase transparency. Make as much of the scientific workflow public as desired - as it is developed or after publication of reports. Find public projects here. Registration. Registering materials can certify what was done in advance of data analysis, or confirm the exact state of the project at important points of the lifecycle such as manuscript submission or at the onset of data collection. Discover public registrations here. Manage scientific workflow. A structured, flexible system can provide efficiency gain to workflow and clarity to project objectives, as pictured.
EMS is the BC Ministry of Environment's primary monitoring data repository. The system was designed to capture data covering physical/chemical and biological analyses performed on water, air, solid waste discharges and ambient monitoring sites throughout the province. It also contains related quality assurance data. Samples are collected by either ministry staff or permittees under the Environmental Management Act and then analyzed in public or private sector laboratories. The majority of such monitoring data is entered into EMS electronically via Electronic Data Transfer (EDT). EMS data is typically available in formatted hard copy reports or electronically in comma delimited (e.g., .csv) files as: Monitoring location-related data, Sample and results-related data. Direct access to EMS is restricted to ministry staff, however public access is available upon request through EMS Web Reporting (
"Seanoe (SEA scieNtific Open data Edition) is a publisher of scientific data in the field of marine sciences. It is operated by Ifremer ( Data published by SEANOE are available free. They can be used in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons license selected by the author of data. Seance contributes to Open Access / Open Science movement for a free access for everyone to all scientific data financed by public funds for the benefit of research. An embargo limited to 2 years on a set of data is possible; for example to restrict access to data of a publication under scientific review. Each data set published by SEANOE has a DOI which enables it to be cited in a publication in a reliable and sustainable way. The long-term preservation of data filed in SEANOE is ensured by Ifremer infrastructure. "
The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) supports researchers with data management services and is focused on building and maintaining a catalog of research data and standards-compliant metadata. Quality data and metadata developed in research projects and curated by NKN is a valuable, long-term asset for a public land-grant University and provides a foundation and source upon which to develop and build new research and science.
The Met Office is the UK's National Weather Service. We have a long history of weather forecasting and have been working in the area of climate change for more than two decades. As a world leader in providing weather and climate services, we employ more than 1,800 at 60 locations throughout the world. We are recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day, an advanced atmospheric model and a high performance supercomputer to create 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings a day. These are delivered to a huge range of customers from the Government, to businesses, the general public, armed forces, and other organisations.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.