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Found 25 result(s)
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
Groundbreaking biomedical research requires access to cutting edge scientific resources; however such resources are often invisible beyond the laboratories or universities where they were developed. eagle-i is a discovery platform that helps biomedical scientists find previously invisible, but highly valuable, resources.
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A human interactome map. The sequencing of the human genome has provided a surprisingly small number of genes, indicating that the complex organization of life is not reflected in the gene number but, rather, in the gene products – that is, in the proteins. These macromolecules regulate the vast majority of cellular processes by their ability to communicate with each other and to assemble into larger functional units. Therefore, the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions is fundamental for the understanding of protein function, cellular processes and, ultimately, the complexity of life. Moreover, interactome maps are particularly needed to link new proteins to disease pathways and the identification of novel drug targets.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.
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The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a set of publicly available databases containing information on releases of specific toxic chemicals and their management as waste, as reported annually by U.S. industrial and federal facilities.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
EBI's CSA contains data documenting enzyme active sites and catalytic residues in enzymes of 3D structure. Entries in CSA may be original hand-annotated entries from primary literature or homologous entries found by PSI-BLAST alignment.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
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ITER contains data in support of human health risk assessments. It is compiled by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and contains data from CDC/ATSDR, Health Canada, RIVM, U.S. EPA, IARC, NSF International and independent parties offering peer-reviewed risk values. ITER provides comparison charts of international risk assessment information and explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations.
GermOnline 4.0 is a cross-species database gateway focusing on high-throughput expression data relevant for germline development, the meiotic cell cycle and mitosis in healthy versus malignant cells. The portal provides access to the Saccharomyces Genomics Viewer (SGV) which facilitates online interpretation of complex data from experiments with high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays that cover the entire yeast genome.
The Antibody Registry exists to give researchers a way to universally identify antibodies used in publications. The registry lists many commercial antibodies from about 200 vendors, which have been assigned a unique identifier. If the antibody that you are using does not appear in the list, an entry can be made by filling in as little as 2 pieces of information: the catalog number and the url of the vendor where our curators can find information and material data sheets.
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IRIS contains data in support of human health risk assessment, including hazard identification and dose-response assessments. It is compiled by the U.S. EPA and contains descriptive and quantitative information related to human cancer and non-cancer health effects that may result from exposure to substances in the environment. IRIS data is reviewed by EPA scientists and represents EPA consensus.
The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is an NIH-funded research data repository that aims to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. NDAR also serves as a scientific community platform and portal to multiple other research repositories, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data. NDAR combines the function of a data repository, which holds genetic, phenotypic, clinical, and medical imaging data, and the function of a scientific community platform, which defines the standard tools and policies to integrate the computational resources developed by scientific research institutions, private foundations, and other federal and state agencies supporting ASD research. Furthermore, NDAR is working to develop the means to connect relevant repositories together through data federation.
CTRI is a free, online public record system for registration of clinical trials being conducted in India since 2007. Initiated as a voluntary measure, since 2009 trial registration in the CTRI has been made mandatory by the Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI). While this register is meant primarily for trials conducted in India, the CTRI will also accept registration of trials conducted in other countries in the region, which do not have a Primary Registry of its own. Registered trials on CTRI are freely searchable from the WHO's search portal and the ICTRP, as well as from the CTRI site.
Here you will find authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.
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The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) is an online register of clinical trials being undertaken in Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere. The ANZCTR includes trials from the full spectrum of therapeutic areas of pharmaceuticals, surgical procedures, preventive measures, lifestyle, devices, treatment and rehabilitation strategies and complementary therapies.
The objective of the Database of Genomic Variants is to provide a comprehensive summary of structural variation in the human genome. We define structural variation as genomic alterations that involve segments of DNA that are larger than >1kb. Now we also annotate InDels in 100bp-1kb range. The content of the database is only representing structural variation identified in healthy control samples. The Database of Genomic Variants provides a useful catalog of control data for studies aiming to correlate genomic variation with phenotypic data. The database is continuously updated with new data from peer reviewed research studies. We always welcome suggestions and comments regarding the database from the research community.
dbSTS is an NCBI resource that contains sequence data for short genomic landmark sequences or Sequence Tagged Sites. STS sequences are incorporated into the STS Division of GenBank.
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A community-based search platform. OMICtools bridges the gap between researchers and tool developers. OMICtools brings together an interactive worldwide user community, linking expert curators who submit, review and categorize tools, to users who strengthen the interface by bringing feedback and reviews.