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Found 84 result(s)
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
The IMSR is a searchable online database of mouse strains, stocks, and mutant ES cell lines available worldwide, including inbred, mutant, and genetically engineered strains. The goal of the IMSR is to assist the international scientific community in locating and obtaining mouse resources for research. Note that the data content found in the IMSR is as supplied by strain repository holders. For each strain or cell line listed in the IMSR, users can obtain information about: Where that resource is available (Repository Site); What state(s) the resource is available as (e.g. live, cryopreserved embryo or germplasm, ES cells); Links to descriptive information about a strain or ES cell line; Links to mutant alleles carried by a strain or ES cell line; Links for ordering a strain or ES cell line from a Repository; Links for contacting the Repository to send a query
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
The data in the U of M’s Clinical Data Repository comes from the electronic health records (EHRs) of more than 2 million patients seen at 8 hospitals and more than 40 clinics. For each patient, data is available regarding the patient's demographics (age, gender, language, etc.), medical history, problem list, allergies, immunizations, outpatient vitals, diagnoses, procedures, medications, lab tests, visit locations, providers, provider specialties, and more.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The GHDx is our user-friendly and searchable data catalog for global health, demographic, and other health-related datasets. It provides detailed information about datasets ranging from censuses and surveys to health records and vital statistics, globally. It also serves as a platform for data owners to share their data with the public. The GDB Compare visualization, which allows the user to see rate of change in disease incidence, globally or by country, by age or across all ages, is especially powerful as a tool. Be sure to try adding a bottom chart, like the map, to augment the treemap that loads by default in the top chart.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
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Human biomaterial banks (short: biobanks) are collections of human body substances (i.e. blood, DNA, urine or tissue) connected with disease specific information. This allow for research of relations between deseases and underlying (molecular) modifications and paves the way for developing target-oriented therapies ("personalized medicine"). The biobank material arises from samples taken for therapeutical or diagnostic reasons or is extracted in the context of clinical trials. An approval for usage by the patient is always needed prior to any research activities.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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The Portal is intended to be used as catalog of datasets published by ministries/ department/ organizations of Government of India for public use, in order to enhance transparency in the functioning of the Government as well as to make innovative visualization of dataset. This National Data Portal is being updated frequently to make it as accessible as possible and completely accessible to all irrespective of physical challenges or technology.
The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is an information tool to help you locate DOE's collections of data and non-text information and, at the same time, retrieve individual datasets within some of those collections. It includes collection citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, as well as citations for individual datasets submitted from DOE Data Centers and other organizations.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
This website makes data available from the first round of data sharing projects that were supported by the CRCNS funding program. To enable concerted efforts in understanding the brain experimental data and other resources such as stimuli and analysis tools should be widely shared by researchers all over the world. To serve this purpose, this website provides a marketplace and discussion forum for sharing tools and data in neuroscience. To date we host experimental data sets of high quality that will be valuable for testing computational models of the brain and new analysis methods. The data include physiological recordings from sensory and memory systems, as well as eye movement data.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
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One of the world’s largest banks of biological, psychosocial and clinical data on people suffering from mental health problems. The Signature center systematically collects biological, psychosocial and clinical indicators from patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency and at four points throughout their journey in the hospital: upon arrival to the emergency room (state of crisis), at the end of their hospital stay, as well as at the beginning and the end of outpatient treatment. For all hospital clients who agree to participate, blood specimens are collected for the purpose of measuring metabolic, genetic, toxic and infectious biomarkers, while saliva samples are collected to measure sex hormones and hair samples are collected to measure stress hormones. Questionnaire has been selected to cover important dimensional aspects of mental illness such as Behaviour and Cognition (Psychosis, Depression, Anxiety, Impulsiveness, Aggression, Suicide, Addiction, Sleep),Socio-demographic Profile (Spiritual beliefs, Social functioning, Childhood experiences, Demographic, Family background) and Medical Data (Medication, Diagnosis, Long-term health, RAMQ data). On 2016, May there are more than 1150 participants and 400 for the longitudinal Follow-Up
This Web resource provides data and information relevant to SARS coronavirus. It includes links to the most recent sequence data and publications, to other SARS related resources, and a pre-computed alignment of genome sequences from various isolates. The genome of SARS-CoV consists of a single, positive-strand RNA that is approximately 29,700 nucleotides long. The overall genome organization of SARS-CoV is similar to that of other coronaviruses. The reference genome includes 13 genes, which encode at least 14 proteins. Two large overlapping reading frames (ORFs) encompass 71% of the genome. The remainder has 12 potential ORFs, including genes for structural proteins S (spike), E (small envelope), M (membrane), and N (nucleocapsid). Other potential ORFs code for unique putative SARS-CoV-specific polypeptides that lack obvious sequence similarity to known proteins.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources: data, materials, and tools accessible via any computer connected to the Internet. An initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NIF advances neuroscience research by enabling discovery and access to public research data and tools worldwide through an open source, networked environment.