Reset all


Content Types


AID systems



Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type


Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages



Repository types


  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 55 result(s)
The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
ICES is an intergovernmental organization whose main objective is to increase the scientific knowledge of the marine environment and its living resources and to use this knowledge to provide unbiased, non-political advice to competent authorities.
The Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS)/Ocean Sciences Division (OSD) data archive contains the holdings of oceanographic data generated by the IOS and other agencies and laboratories, including the Institute of Oceanography at the University of British Columbia and the Pacific Biological Station. The contents include data from B.C. coastal waters and inlets, B.C. continental shelf waters, open ocean North Pacific waters, Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Archipelago.
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
As the national oceanographic data centre for Canada, MEDS maintains centralized repositories of some oceanographic data types collected in Canada, and coordinates data exchanges between DFO and recognized intergovernmental organizations, as well as acts as a central point for oceanographic data requests. Real-time, near real-time (for operational oceanography) or historical data are made available as appropriate.
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32,, funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada’s performance on key environmental sustainability issues including climate change and air quality, water quality and availability, and protected nature. The CESI website ensures that national, regional, local and international trends are readily accessible and transparently presented to all Canadians through the use of graphics, explanatory text, interactive maps and downloadable data.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
The Environmental Data Initiative Repository concentrates on studies of ecological processes that play out at time scales spanning decades to centuries including those of the NSF Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, the NSF Macrosystems Biology Program, the NSF Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) program, the Organization of Biological Field Stations, and others. The repository hosts data that provide a context to evaluate the nature and pace of ecological change, to interpret its effects, and to forecast the range of future biological responses to change.
The Polar Data Center (PDC) manages the Science Database among other repositories for Japanese polar research. The Science Database is the destination repository for all Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) data as well as the Japanese contribution to the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. Metadata are in English and Japanese, and metadata records are shared with the Global Change Master Directory.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS):, see also:
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.