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ToxoDB is a genome database for the genus Toxoplasma, a set of single-celled eukaryotic pathogens that cause human and animal diseases, including toxoplasmosis.
AmoebaDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for Entamoeba and Acanthamoeba parasites. In its first iteration (released in early 2010), AmoebaDB contains the genomes of three Entamoeba species (see below). AmoebaDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and will rapidly expand to include experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers . The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
The Landcare Research DataStore ('the DataStore') is the general data catalogue and repository for Environmental Research Data from Landcare Research. Much of Landcare Research’s research data is available through specific web pages, but many datasets sit outside these areas. This new data repository provides a mechanism for our staff to deposit and document this wider range of datasets so that they may be discovered and potentially re-used.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
This site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of better health outcomes for all. In a recent article, Todd Park, United States Chief Technology Officer, captured the essence of what the Health Data Initiative is all about and why our efforts here are so important.