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The PAIN Repository is a recently funded NIH initiative, which has two components: an archive for already collected imaging data (Archived Repository), and a repository for structural and functional brain images and metadata acquired prospectively using standardized acquisition parameters (Standardized Repository) in healthy control subjects and patients with different types of chronic pain. The PAIN Repository provides the infrastructure for storage of standardized resting state functional, diffusion tensor imaging and structural brain imaging data and associated biological, physiological and behavioral metadata from multiple scanning sites, and provides tools to facilitate analysis of the resulting comprehensive data sets.
Older persons are often referred to physicians because of complaints of progressive difficulties in walking. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients is complex. Multiple physiologic subsystems may influence the ability to walk and no standard criteria are currently available to establish whether these subsystems are functioning within the “normal” range. To address lack of knowledge Dr. Luigi Ferrucci and Dr. Stefania Bandinelli conducted InCHIANTI, a representative population-based study of older persons living in the Chianti geographic area (Tuscany, Italy). The data collection started in September 1998 and was completed in March 2000. 3 and 6-year follow-up assessment of the InCHIANTI study population were performed in the years 2001-2003 and 2004-2006. A nine-year follow-up is already planned and funded through an NIA grant. The InCHIANTI Biobank is a collection of biological samples of the study population.