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Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) is an initiative of CSIR Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. It is supported by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Department of Biotechnology (DBT) of India. The Indian people represent one-sixth of the world population and consists of a ethnically, geographically, and genetically diverse population. In some communities the ratio of genetic disorder is relatively high due to consanguineous marriage practiced in the community. This database has been created to keep track of mutations in the causal genes for genetic diseases common in India and help the physicians, geneticists, and other professionals retrieve and use the information for the benefit of the public. The database includes scientific information about these genetic diseases and disabilities, but also statistical information about these diseases in today's society. Data is categorized by body part affected and then by title of the disease.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
Addgene archives and distributes plasmids for researchers around the globe. They are working with thousands of laboratories to assemble a high-quality library of published plasmids for use in research and discovery. By linking plasmids with articles, scientists can always find data related to the materials they request.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide.
MalaCards is an integrated database of human maladies and their annotations, modeled on the architecture and richness of the popular GeneCards database of human genes. MalaCards mines and merges varied web data sources to generate a computerized web card for each human disease. Each MalaCard contains disease specific prioritized annotative information, as well as links between associated diseases, leveraging the GeneCards relational database, search engine, and GeneDecks set-distillation tool. As proofs of concept of the search/distill/infer pipeline we find expected elucidations, as well as potentially novel ones.