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BiGG is a knowledgebase of Biochemically, Genetically and Genomically structured genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions. BiGG integrates several published genome-scale metabolic networks into one resource with standard nomenclature which allows components to be compared across different organisms. BiGG can be used to browse model content, visualize metabolic pathway maps, and export SBML files of the models for further analysis by external software packages. Users may follow links from BiGG to several external databases to obtain additional information on genes, proteins, reactions, metabolites and citations of interest.
Recode2 is a database of genes that utilize non-standard translation for gene expression purposes. Recoding events described in the database include programmed ribosomal frameshifting, translational bypassing (aka hopping) and mRNA specific codon redefinition. Frameshifting at a particular site often yields two protein products from one coding sequence and sometimes serves a regulatory purpose by acting as a sensor of the level of product protein or of some external ligand. Bypassing (hopping) allows the coupling of two ORFs separated on an mRNA by a coding gap. Codon redefinition occurs when a stop codon is decoded as a standard amino acid (often glutamine or tryptophan), or the 21st amino acid selenocysteine. These recoding events are in competition with standard decoding and are site specific. The efficiency of recoding is often modulated by cis-stimulators and sometimes by trans-factors. The sequences of the genes that use recoding for their expression are in the database. The recoding sites and the known stimulatory signals are annotated in the database together with notes on factors that are known to affect recoding efficiencies.
Complete Genomics provides free public access to a variety of whole human genome data sets generated from Complete Genomics’ sequencing service. The research community can explore and familiarize themselves with the quality of these data sets, review the data formats provided from our sequencing service, and augment their own research with additional summaries of genomic variation across a panel of diverse individuals. The quality of these data sets is representative of what a customer can expect to receive for their own samples. This public genome repository comprises genome results from both our Standard Sequencing Service (69 standard, non-diseased samples) and the Cancer Sequencing Service (two matched tumor and normal sample pairs). In March 2013 Complete Genomics was acquired by BGI-Shenzhen , the world’s largest genomics services company. BGI is a company headquartered in Shenzhen, China that provides comprehensive sequencing and bioinformatics services for commercial science, medical, agricultural and environmental applications. Complete Genomics is now focused on building a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology and developing new and exciting research, clinical and consumer applications.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide.
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KEGG is a database resource for understanding high-level functions and utilities of the biological system, such as the cell, the organism and the ecosystem, from molecular-level information, especially large-scale molecular datasets generated by genome sequencing and other high-throughput experimental technologies