Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 18 result(s)
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
Country
The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
DNASU is a central repository for plasmid clones and collections. Currently we store and distribute over 200,000 plasmids including 75,000 human and mouse plasmids, full genome collections, the protein expression plasmids from the Protein Structure Initiative as the PSI: Biology Material Repository (PSI : Biology-MR), and both small and large collections from individual researchers. We are also a founding member and distributor of the ORFeome Collaboration plasmid collection.
dbEST is a division of GenBank that contains sequence data and other information on "single-pass" cDNA sequences, or "Expressed Sequence Tags", from a number of organisms. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short (usually about 300-500 bp), single-pass sequence reads from mRNA (cDNA). Typically they are produced in large batches. They represent a snapshot of genes expressed in a given tissue and/or at a given developmental stage. They are tags (some coding, others not) of expression for a given cDNA library. Most EST projects develop large numbers of sequences. These are commonly submitted to GenBank and dbEST as batches of dozens to thousands of entries, with a great deal of redundancy in the citation, submitter and library information. To improve the efficiency of the submission process for this type of data, we have designed a special streamlined submission process and data format. dbEST also includes sequences that are longer than the traditional ESTs, or are produced as single sequences or in small batches. Among these sequences are products of differential display experiments and RACE experiments. The thing that these sequences have in common with traditional ESTs, regardless of length, quality, or quantity, is that there is little information that can be annotated in the record. If a sequence is later characterized and annotated with biological features such as a coding region, 5'UTR, or 3'UTR, it should be submitted through the regular GenBank submissions procedure (via BankIt or Sequin), even if part of the sequence is already in dbEST. dbEST is reserved for single-pass reads. Assembled sequences should not be submitted to dbEST. GenBank will accept assembled EST submissions for the forthcoming TSA (Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly) division. The individual reads which make up the assembly should be submitted to dbEST, the Trace archive or the Short Read Archive (SRA) prior to the submission of the assemblies.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
Country
We developed a method, ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq), combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and massively parallel sequencing to identify mammalian DNA sequences bound by transcription factors in vivo. We used ChIP-seq to map STAT1 targets in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated and unstimulated human HeLa S3 cells, and compared the method's performance to ChIP-PCR and to ChIP-chip for four chromosomes.For both Chromatin- immunoprecipation Transcription Factors and Histone modifications. Sequence files and the associated probability files are also provided.
Content type(s)
Country
A small genotype data repository containing data used in recent papers from the Estonian Biocentre. Most of the data pertains to human population genetics. PDF files of the papers are also freely available.
Addgene archives and distributes plasmids for researchers around the globe. They are working with thousands of laboratories to assemble a high-quality library of published plasmids for use in research and discovery. By linking plasmids with articles, scientists can always find data related to the materials they request.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation containing data from multiple gene studies. Users can browse data containing the number of variant cells from each study, and filter studies by organism, study type, method and genomic variant. Organisms include human, mouse, cattle and several additional animals. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017 ***
GeneWeaver combines cross-species data and gene entity integration, scalable hierarchical analysis of user data with a community-built and curated data archive of gene sets and gene networks, and tools for data driven comparison of user-defined biological, behavioral and disease concepts. Gene Weaver allows users to integrate gene sets across species, tissue and experimental platform. It differs from conventional gene set over-representation analysis tools in that it allows users to evaluate intersections among all combinations of a collection of gene sets, including, but not limited to annotations to controlled vocabularies. There are numerous applications of this approach. Sets can be stored, shared and compared privately, among user defined groups of investigators, and across all users.
The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project is a collaboration between the Broad Institute, and the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and its Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation to conduct a detailed genetic and pharmacologic characterization of a large panel of human cancer models, to develop integrated computational analyses that link distinct pharmacologic vulnerabilities to genomic patterns and to translate cell line integrative genomics into cancer patient stratification. The CCLE provides public access to genomic data, analysis and visualization for about 1000 cell lines.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide.
The GSS database collects unannotated, short, single-read, primary genomic sequences from GenBank and contains nucleic acid sequences. These sequences include random survey sequences, clone-end sequences, and exon-trapped sequences.