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Found 9 result(s)
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
The Cancer Immunome Database (TCIA) provides results of comprehensive immunogenomic analyses of next generation sequencing data (NGS) data for 19 solid cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other datasource. The Cancer Immunome Atlas (TCIA) was developed and is maintained at the Division of Bioinformatics (ICBI). The database can be queried for the gene expression of specific immune-related gene sets, cellular composition of immune infiltrates (characterized using gene set enrichment analyses and deconvolution), neoantigens and cancer-germline antigens, HLA types, and tumor heterogeneity (estimated from cancer cell fractions). Moreover it provides survival analyses for different types immunological parameters. TCIA will be constantly updated with new data and results.
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
GeneWeaver combines cross-species data and gene entity integration, scalable hierarchical analysis of user data with a community-built and curated data archive of gene sets and gene networks, and tools for data driven comparison of user-defined biological, behavioral and disease concepts. Gene Weaver allows users to integrate gene sets across species, tissue and experimental platform. It differs from conventional gene set over-representation analysis tools in that it allows users to evaluate intersections among all combinations of a collection of gene sets, including, but not limited to annotations to controlled vocabularies. There are numerous applications of this approach. Sets can be stored, shared and compared privately, among user defined groups of investigators, and across all users.
The Melanoma Molecular Map Project (MMMP) is an open access, interactive web-based multidatabase dedicated to the research on melanoma biology and therapy. The aim of this non-profit project is to create an organized and continuously updated databank collecting the huge and ever growing amount of scientific knowledge on melanoma currently scattered in thousands of articles published in hundreds of Journals.
>>>!!!<<< caArray Retirement Announcement >>>!!!<<< The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) instance of the caArray database was retired on March 31st, 2015. All publicly-accessible caArray data and annotations will be archived and will remain available via FTP download https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/UYHeDQ and is also available at GEO http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ . >>>!!!<<< While NCI will not be able to provide technical support for the caArray software after the retirement, the source code is available on GitHub https://github.com/NCIP/caarray , and we encourage continued community development. Molecular Analysis of Brain Neoplasia (Rembrandt fine-00037) gene expression data has been loaded into ArrayExpress: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/experiments/E-MTAB-3073 >>>!!!<<< caArray is an open-source, web and programmatically accessible microarray data management system that supports the annotation of microarray data using MAGE-TAB and web-based forms. Data and annotations may be kept private to the owner, shared with user-defined collaboration groups, or made public. The NCI instance of caArray hosts many cancer-related public datasets available for download.