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Found 41 result(s)
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Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) is an initiative of CSIR Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. It is supported by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Department of Biotechnology (DBT) of India. The Indian people represent one-sixth of the world population and consists of a ethnically, geographically, and genetically diverse population. In some communities the ratio of genetic disorder is relatively high due to consanguineous marriage practiced in the community. This database has been created to keep track of mutations in the causal genes for genetic diseases common in India and help the physicians, geneticists, and other professionals retrieve and use the information for the benefit of the public. The database includes scientific information about these genetic diseases and disabilities, but also statistical information about these diseases in today's society. Data is categorized by body part affected and then by title of the disease.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. The tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans encompass the largest biogeographic region on the planet, the Indo-Pacific
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
BiGG is a knowledgebase of Biochemically, Genetically and Genomically structured genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions. BiGG integrates several published genome-scale metabolic networks into one resource with standard nomenclature which allows components to be compared across different organisms. BiGG can be used to browse model content, visualize metabolic pathway maps, and export SBML files of the models for further analysis by external software packages. Users may follow links from BiGG to several external databases to obtain additional information on genes, proteins, reactions, metabolites and citations of interest.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
The CCDB project was started in 1998 under the auspices of the Human Brain Project to provide a venue for sharing and mining cellular and subcellular data derived from light and electron microscopy, including correlated imaging. It was one of the first web databases devoted to the then emerging technique of electron tomography. The CCDB has been on-line since 2002.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
AceView provides a curated, comprehensive and non-redundant sequence representation of all public mRNA sequences (mRNAs from GenBank or RefSeq, and single pass cDNA sequences from dbEST and Trace). These experimental cDNA sequences are first co-aligned on the genome then clustered into a minimal number of alternative transcript variants and grouped into genes. Using exhaustively and with high quality standards the available cDNA sequences evidences the beauty and complexity of mammals’ transcriptome, and the relative simplicity of the nematode and plant transcriptomes. Genes are classified according to their inferred coding potential; many presumably non-coding genes are discovered. Genes are named by Entrez Gene names when available, else by AceView gene names, stable from release to release. Alternative features (promoters, introns and exons, polyadenylation signals) and coding potential, including motifs, domains, and homologies are annotated in depth; tissues where expression has been observed are listed in order of representation; diseases, phenotypes, pathways, functions, localization or interactions are annotated by mining selected sources, in particular PubMed, GAD and Entrez Gene, and also by performing manual annotation, especially in the worm. In this way, both the anatomy and physiology of the experimentally cDNA supported human, mouse and nematode genes are thoroughly annotated.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
This site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of better health outcomes for all. In a recent article, Todd Park, United States Chief Technology Officer, captured the essence of what the Health Data Initiative is all about and why our efforts here are so important.
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The Swedish Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues and cells assembled in tissue microarrays. Confocal microscopy analysis using human cell lines is performed for more detailed protein localization. The program hosts the Human Protein Atlas portal with expression profiles of human proteins in tissues and cells. The main objective of the resource centre is to produce specific antibodies to human target proteins using a high-throughput production method involving the cloning and protein expression of Protein Epitope Signature Tags (PrESTs). After purification, the antibodies are used to study expression profiles in cells and tissues and for functional analysis of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms.
The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
The Fungal Genetics Stock Center has preserved and distributed strains of genetically characterized fungi since 1960. The collection includes over 20,000 accessioned strains of classical and genetically engineered mutants of key model, human, and plant pathogenic fungi. These materials are distributed as living stocks to researchers around the world.
The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project is a collaboration between the Broad Institute, and the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and its Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation to conduct a detailed genetic and pharmacologic characterization of a large panel of human cancer models, to develop integrated computational analyses that link distinct pharmacologic vulnerabilities to genomic patterns and to translate cell line integrative genomics into cancer patient stratification. The CCLE provides public access to genomic data, analysis and visualization for about 1000 cell lines.
LifeMap Discovery® is a compendium of embryonic development for stem cell research and regenerative medicine, constructed by integrating extensive molecular, cellular, anatomical and medical data curated from scientific literature and high-throughput data sources.
HumanCyc provides an encyclopedic reference on human metabolic pathways. It provides a zoomable human metabolic map diagram, and it has been used to generate a steady-state quantitative model of human metabolism.
The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR) is a collection of databases and tools designed to help researchers study the genetics of human ageing using modern approaches such as functional genomics, network analyses, systems biology and evolutionary analyses.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide.