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Found 11 result(s)
The Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies (CFAS) are population based studies of individuals aged 65 years and over living in the community, including institutions, which is the only large multi-centred population-based study in the UK that has reached sufficient maturity. There are three main studies within the CFAS group. MRC CFAS, the original study began in 1989, with three of its sites providing a parent subset for the comparison two decades later with CFAS II (2008 onwards). Subsequently another CFAS study, CFAS Wales began in 2011.
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The JenAge Ageing Factor Database AgeFactDB is aimed at the collection and integration of ageing phenotype and lifespan data. Ageing factors are genes, chemical compounds or other factors such as dietary restriction, for example. In a first step ageing-related data are primarily taken from existing databases. In addition, new ageing-related information is included both by manual and automatic information extraction from the scientific literature. Based on a homology analysis, AgeFactDB also includes genes that are homologous to known ageing-related genes. These homologs are considered as candidate or putative ageing-related genes.
The FREEBIRD website aims to facilitate data sharing in the area of injury and emergency research in a timely and responsible manner. It has been launched by providing open access to anonymised data on over 30,000 injured patients (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials).
TRAILS is a prospective cohort study, which started in 2001 with population cohort and 2004 with a clinical cohort (CC). Since then, a group of 2500 young people from the Northern part of the Netherlands has been closely monitored in order to chart and explain their mental, physical, and social development. These TRAILS participants have been measured every two to three years, by means of questionnaires, interviews, and all kinds of tests. By now, we have collected information that spans the total period from preadolescence up until young adulthood. One of the main goals of TRAILS is to contribute to the knowledge of the development of emotional and behavioral problems and the (social) functioning of preadolescents into adulthood, their determinants, and underlying mechanisms.
CPES provides access to information that relates to mental disorders among the general population. Its primary goal is to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders and their treatments in adult populations in the United States. It also allows for research related to cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. CPES combines the data collected in three different nationally representative surveys (National Comorbidity Survey Replication, National Survey of American Life, National Latino and Asian American Study).
PhysioNet is an on-line forum for the dissemination and exchange of recorded biomedical signals and open-source software for analyzing them. It provides facilities for the cooperative analysis of data and the evaluation of proposed new algorithms. In addition to providing free electronic access to PhysioBank data and PhysioToolkit software via the World Wide Web. PhysioNet offers services and training via on-line tutorials to assist users with varying levels of expertise. PhysioNet is a resource for biomedical research and development. It has three closely interdependent components: PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals, time series, and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes more than 60 collections of cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging. PhysioToolkit is a large and growing library of software for physiologic signal processing and analysis, detection of physiologically significant events using both classical techniques and novel methods based on statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics, interactive display and characterization of signals, creation of new databases, simulation of physiologic and other signals, quantitative evaluation and comparison of analysis methods, and analysis of nonequilibrium and nonstationary processes. PhysioNetWorks is a virtual laboratory where you can work together with us and with colleagues anywhere in the world to create, evaluate, improve, document, and prepare new data and software "works" for publication on PhysioNet. Unlike all other parts of the PhysioNet web site, access to PhysioNetWorks is password-protected. (Accounts are free and a password can be obtained in a minute or two.)
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REGARDS is an observational study of risk factors for stroke in adults 45 years or older. 30,239 participants were recruited between January 2003 and October 2007. They completed a telephone interview followed by an in-home physical exam. Measurements included traditional risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and an echocardiogram of the heart. At six month intervals, participants are contacted by phone to ask about stroke symptoms, hospitalizations and general health status. The study is ongoing and will follow participants for many years.
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative funded under contract HHSS283201500001C with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). CBHSQ has primary responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of SAMHSA's behavioral health data. Public use files and restricted use files are provided. CBHSQ promotes the access and use of the nation's substance abuse and mental health data through SAMHDA. SAMHDA provides public-use data files, file documentation, and access to restricted-use data files to support a better understanding of this critical area of public health.
PhysioBank is a large and growing archive of well-characterized digital recordings of physiologic signals and related data for use by the biomedical research community. PhysioBank currently includes databases of multi-parameter cardiopulmonary, neural, and other biomedical signals from healthy subjects and patients with a variety of conditions with major public health implications, including sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, epilepsy, gait disorders, sleep apnea, and aging.